Observers' Challenges for September 2019

oecheverri's picture
Here are the Observers' Challenges for September 2019.
 
Beginner Challenge Intermediate Challenge Advanced Challenge Lunar Challenge

M20
(NGC 6514)

a.k.a the Triffid Nebula, is a gaseous (HII) region in Sagittarius.

Image from huntsvillastronomy.org

Barnard 86
 
 is a dark nebula (a "Bok globule") also located in the  constellation of Sagittarius near NGC6520, which was possibly this open cluster.

Image from Coldpring Observatory

Abell 70

is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Aquila, and a challenging target at a mere 42" diameter.

Image from Astronomy Sketch of the Day

Montes Harbinger
 
is a cluster of mountains to be found on the north-wetsren border of Mare Imbrium and covers about 900 sq km.

Image from Lunar and Planetary Lab at U Arizona.
 

 
I still encourage more people submit reports than did this past month -- I encourage everyone to participate, not just imagers! You can submit reports by way of images, sketches, or even without any imagery, you can come up and give a verbal report that perhaps includes the conditions you made your observations under, and the details of the equipment you used -- and of course a description of the object as you observed it! Be sure to send them to me for inclusion in the next meeting at meetingchair[at]ottawa.rasc.ca

Observers' Challenges for August 2019

oecheverri's picture
Here are the Observers' Challenges for August 2019.
 
Beginner Challenge Intermediate Challenge Advanced Challenge Lunar Challenge

M8
(NGC 6523)

a.k.a the Lagoon Nebula, is an open star cluster with nebulosity in Sagittarius.

Image from Wikipedia

NGC 6886
 
NGC 6886 is a planetary nebula with a size of only about 0.3 X 0.45 light-year, located some 7,000 to 11,000 light-years away from Earth in the northern constellation of Sagitta.

Image from Courtney Seligman

Abell Galaxy Cluster 2151

also known as the Hercules Cluster (and not to be confused with the globular cluster M13)  comprises about 200 galaxies some 500 million light-years distant in the constellation Hercules. It is rich in spiral galaxies and shows many interacting galaxies.

Image source https://digilander.libero.it/astrovalfos/abell2151wide.htm

Rupes Kelvin & Promontorium Kelvin
 
Rupes Kelvin is a 78 km long escarpment near Promontorium Kelvin, a headland  located in the southeast of the Mare Humorum.

Image from Antonio Chidadao's "Moon Light Atlas"

 
I'd like to see more people submit reports than did this past month -- I encourage everyone to participate, not just imagers! You can submit reports by way of images, sketches, or even without any imagery, you can come up and give a verbal report that perhaps includes the conditions you made your observations under, and the details of the equipment you used -- and of course a description of the object as you observed it! Be sure to send them to me for inclusion in the next meeting at meetingchair[at]ottawa.rasc.ca

Videos added for March and April 2019 Meetings.

Boismichel's picture

In March, Sharon Odell provided an update on the work and prospects of the RASC Ottawa Diminion Observatory Subcomittee's work to preserve and conserve the original observatory, and also presented a video testimony to "Courage and Passion: Canadian Womern in Natural Sciences" during the break. Following that, astrophysicist Dr Matt Caplan of the McGill Space Institute took the audience into the nasty, throbbing nuclear waffles pasta at hearts of neutron stars that yield gold (and other, more useful stuff), and highlighted the "remarkable agreement between theory and more theory" underpinning these discoveries. See the video here.

  

Following, at the April meeting, Dr Janet Tulloch of Carleton University continued to fascinate with the presentation started back at the February meeting on the "Outstanding Standing Stones" eatsblished in neolithic Orkneys and especially their solsticial alignments, and that can be found here.

 

Observers' Challenges for May 2019

oecheverri's picture
Here are the Observers' Challenges for May 2019.
 
Beginner Challenge Intermediate Challenge Advanced Challenge Lunar Challenge

M101
(NGC 5457)

a.k.a the Piwheel Galaxy, is a face-on "grand design" spiral galaxy distanced 21 million light-years (six megaparsecs)[3] away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major.

Text and iage from Wikipedia

NGC 4361
 
NGC 4361 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Corvus.

Hickson Compact Group 50

Hickson 50 is considered the most difficult of the Hickson galaxy groups to observe. It is estimated by some to be 2 billion light-years in distance, based on red shift measurements.

Image source http://www.faintfuzzies.com/OR-April162012-FD-Hick.html

Lambert R
 "Gohst crater" Lambert R
Just to the south of Lambert's ramparts is the lava-covered rim of Lambert R, a crater that is almost completely covered by the mare. The diameter of this ghost crater is larger than Lambert, but it is difficult to spot except when the Sun is at a very low angle, casting long shadows.

Text and iage from Wikipedia

 
I'd like to see more people submit reports than did this past month -- I encourage everyone to participate, not just imagers! You can submit reports by way of images, sketches, or even without any imagery, you can come up and give a verbal report that perhaps includes the conditions you made your observations under, and the details of the equipment you used -- and of course a description of the object as you observed it! Be sure to send them to me for inclusion in the next meeting at meetingchair[at]ottawa.rasc.ca

Observers' Challenges for April 2019

oecheverri's picture
Here are the Observers' Challenges for April 2019.
 
Beginner Challenge Intermediate Challenge Advanced Challenge Lunar Challenge

M82
(NGC 3034)

a.k.a the Cigar Galaxy is a starburst galaxy approximately 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major.

M109
(NGC 3992)
 
is a barred spiral galaxy exhibiting a weak inner ring structure around the central bar approximately 90 million light-yearsaway also in the constellation Ursa Major.

Galaxies Beyond M44

Beyond the Beehive Cluster in Cancer lie at least 9 galaxies in which can be spotted in large scopes.

 

The Hortensius Dome Field
 
formed as a result of the Moon's own internal volcanism and are similar to shield volcanoes in Iceland, Hawaiʻi and Olympus Mons on Mars, formed when highly fluid lavas erupt through a central caldera onto the surface.
 
I'd like to see more people submit reports than did this past month -- I encourage everyone to participate, not just imagers! You can submit reports by way of images, sketches, or even without any imagery, you can come up and give a verbal report that perhaps includes the conditions you made your observations under, and the details of the equipment you used -- and of course a description of the object as you observed it! Be sure to send them to me for inclusion in the next meeting at meetingchair[at]ottawa.rasc.ca

Pages

Subscribe to Royal Astronomical Society of Canada RSS