AstroNotes 1985 November Vol: 24 issue 10

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A S T R O N O T E S
ISSN 0048-8682
The Newsletter Magazine of the Ottawa Centre of the RASC
Vol. 24, No. 10
$5.00 a year
November
1985
Editor........Rolf Meier..... 4-A Arnold Dr.......820-5784
Addresses.... Art Fraser......92 Lillico Dr.......737-4110
Circulation...Robin Molson....2029 Garfield Ave...225-3082
SIR EDMOND HALLEY RHYMES WITH OTTAWA VALLEY
Thomas Wray
All together now, please - repeat after me:
“Sir
Edmund Halley rhymes with Ottawa Valley". Eventually we'll
all get it right! Although Sir Edmund occasionally spelled
his last name Hawley instead of Halley, to pronounce the
first syllable as hall instead of hal is now considered
pedantic.
A survey recently done in England and reported
on
the
CBC
indicates
that
the
accepted
modern
pronunciation, used by almost all Halleys nowadays, is Hal
for the first syllable, making Halley rhyme with valley.
The one pronunciation that is definitely wrong is the
one where the first syllable comes out as hail.
This is
the pronunciation for Hailey or Haley, but it certainly
isn't the pronunciation for Halley, which has two l's not
one.
The rock group of 30 years ago, "Bill Haley and his
Comets", was named after a one-ell Halley.
The comet of
1682 was named for a two-ell Halley.
Please, members of
the RASC giving talks at the Observer's Group, get Sir
Edmund's name right.
*
* *
COMETS, COMETS EVERYWHERE
Rolf Meier
Over the past several months, the comet viewing has
been getting much better.
First
to
come
along
was
periodic
Comet
Giacobini-Zinner, which was widely observed during the
summer.
At its best, Giacobini-Zinner was of a high
surface brightness, condensed, and with a small tail.
It
was the best comet around for a while.
An interesting
-1-property of this comet was the ability to watch its rapid
motion among the star background.
Its great condensation
helped in this regard.
Giacobini-Zinner has gradually faded, and has now gone
much further south. While it was previously visible in the
evening sky, it has now moved into the morning sky.
It is
still worth looking at, especially if you want to see how
many comets you can see in one night.
It is a telescopic
object of perhaps 10th magnitude or so,
A good ephemeris
for the comet can be found in the Observer's Handbook.
A second comet which can now be seen is a more recent
discovery.
This one is the new Comet Hartley-Good
(19851).
Like many new comets, this one was discovered by
professional astronomers, namely Hartley and Good, on a
photographic plate. They used the 1.2-m UK Schmidt, which
is located in the southern hemisphere.
The discovery
declination was around -27 degrees, so it would have been
possible to discover it from here, although it was faint at
about 12th magnitude.
Frank Roy observed Hartley-Good on the night of
October 7/8 at 22:00 EDT and reports that the magnitude
then was 7.5 or 8. He also described it as follows:
"The
comet had a small bright condensation with a large faint
coma of over 0.25 degree and a large but faint tail
extending at least 0.5 degree".
Hartley-Good will brighten to about magnitude 6.6 in
December, making it a good binocular object.
An ephemeris
for this comet is found on page 6.
And this brings us to our third comet.
As you have
all guessed, this must be Halley’s (rhymes with valley’s)
Comet.
Halley started out very disappointing in late August
when we first saw it.
It was still about 2 magnitudes
fainter than had been predicted.
It was only a marginal
object for the 16-inch for a while.
And then, during
October, it finally began to brighten noticeably.
My last
observation at the time of this writing was on the morning
of October 21, when I saw it from the D. Aubrey Moodie
schoolground.
This is an edge-of-the-city site, so I knew
that it was finally getting to be a reasonable object.
During November, it should get quite a bit brighter
yet, and even be visible in binoculars.
On the next 2
pages there is a map of Halley’s path during November.
This is a map I made for our "Halley Handbook", which I am
happy to report is now in the hands of the printer, who is
doing the reproduction free of charge!
We will be
-2-4-handing out this booklet free of charge to the public at
star nights and through selected stores.
Frank Roy has compiled the observations of Halley's
comet made so far at IRO, and they are reproduced below:
Date
1985 Observer Notes
Aug. 21/22 R o lf Meier Saw H a lle y 's com et.
sm all.
Aug. 27/28 Frank Roy Photo H a lle y 's , 15min. Fuji400D
16” f/5
S e p t .11/12 Frank Roy F ir s t sigh tin g o f H alley's comet
~12.5 very d i f f u s e .
S e p t .12/13 Doug George Stayed a l l night. Frank and I saw
H a lle y 's & G -Z a g a in .
Frank Roy H a lle y
ta il.
Sep t. 13/14 Doug George Saw P/Halley & P/Giacoboni-Zinner
S e p t .14/15 Sandy Ferguson Comet H a l l e y f i r s t
moving experience!
S e p t .16/17 Frank Roy Halley ~12.5 very d iffu se >1'
S e p t.20/21 Frank Roy Halley ~12.5 very d iffu s e .
S e p t.24/25 Doug George H a lle y 's ~ 12 some condensation
much easier to see.
O ct.
19/20 Frank Roy
~ 12.5 v e r y d i f f u s e
O ct.
20/21 Frank Roy
no
time!!
Comet
Halley
central
condensation, coma mag. ~10.5
Sandy Ferguson Comet H alley, a fin e
Simon Tsang
14th mag.,
night
Saw Halley
Comet
Halley
central
condensation, coma mag. ~10.2
> 10 '
5-
ACOMET HARTLEY-GOOD - 1985l
date (UT)
Oct 22 1985
27
Nov 1
6
11
16
21
26
Dec 1
6
11
16
21
26
31
Jan 5 1986
10
15
20
25
30
RA
19h
19
19
18
18
18
18
17
17
17
17
17
16
16
16
16
16
16
15
15
15
(1950.0)
54.0m
27.2
05.5
47.4
31.8
17.8
04.6
51.7
39.0
26.3
14.9
02.0
50.7
40.1
30.0
20.2
10.6
00.6
49.8
37.8
24.2
Dec
-4°
-0
+3
+6
+9
+11
+13
+14
+15
+15
+15
+14
+13
+12
+10
+8
+6
+4
+1
-1
-3
32'
02
45
53
28
35
16
30
17
34
22
41
36
09
26
29
21
03
36
01
48
mag
7.5
7.3
7.1
6.8
6.6
6.6
6.9
7.4
7.9
8.3
8.7
The above ephem eris was calculated by Brian Marsden.
* *
*
LEONID METEOR SESSION PLANNED
Frank Roy
The annual Leonids reach maximum on November 17 at 17h
UT (12h EST). They have a single observer hourly rate of
15, according to the Observer's Handbook.
This meteor
stream is rather famous because every 33 years there is a
storm, with several thousand meteors per hour seen, with
the last one having been in 1966; therefore the next storm
will occur in 1999.
This year,
the moon sets by 20:00 on Saturday,
November 16.
A meteor session is planned for IRO that
night, and also for Sunday night.
Meteor observing is really enjoyable and a good
opportunity to meet other members of the club.
Interested
members are welcome.
For more information, please feel
free to contact me at 820-0874.
-6-ASTRO NOTES
c / o H e r z b e r g I n s t i t u t e of A s t r o p h y s i c s
National Research Council of Canada
1 0 0 Sussex Drive
O t t a wa Canada
K 1 A 0 R6
MS. ROSEMARY
FREEMAN
NAT. SECRATARY RASC
136 DUPONT ST.
TORONTO
ONT.
M5 B 1V2
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