AstroNotes 2020 December Vol: 59 issue 12

Editor’s Message. President’s Report. Financial Statements.Annual Awards. Ottawa Skies. Hot Topic. Monthly Challenge Objects. Submitted Images. Estelle’s Pick of the Month. Carp Star Parties. FLO Star Parties. Next Meeting. Centre Information

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37

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Volume 59 – No. 12 –December 2020

Send submissions to: astronotes@ottawa.rasc.ca .
All copyrights, including the photographs, belong directly to the authors. No reprints without permission.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Editor’s Message

Welcome to December and the end of another year. This has been an interesting and unusual year to say the least. With the arrival of the COVID pandemic we faced unprecedented upheaval in all aspects of what we do. Our Public Star Parties were completely halted but some clever people in the group managed to still hold a virtual International Astronomy Day with over 800 “attendees”. Thanks to the efforts of Dave Chisholm and Chris Teron working with National we have not missed a monthly meeting since the closure of the Aviation & Space Museum in the spring. While we missed a few member star parties at the FLO due to the Mill of Kintail and grounds being closed by the Province for a couple of months, we did manage to hold most of the scheduled events.

This is also the month of our Annual General Meeting and it is the year that our current Executive ends their two-year term. I am sure I speak for all of you when I congratulate Mike Moghadam on a job well done. Mike dealt with his role as President the way he deals with most things, by going above and beyond the call of duty each and every time. I know from discussions with Mike that he is really looking forward to his new role as Past President. Thank you for all you have done Mike.

We have a new President, Stephen Nourse and a new Vice-President, Dave Chisholm. On behalf of the membership, Welcome. Stephen has been VP for the last two years and prior to that, served on Council for many years. Dave has been doing the Ottawa Skies segment of our monthly meeting for several years now (also included in AstroNotes) as well as hosting those meeting for the past year or so. Dave’s outreach activities are legendary. We are in very capable hands.

This is also the month we announce the annual awards which are usually presented at the Annual Dinner Meeting cancel this year, of course, due to a certain virus. We have the list of recipients for you.

Clear skies and stay safe,

Gordon

President’s Report

2020 Ottawa Centre President’s Report

I am pleased to report that the Ottawa Centre has remained a strong, healthy RASC centre in 2020 in spite of the challenges introduced by the COVID19 global pandemic. Let me share with you the highlights of 2020.

Without a doubt the most remarkable achievement of 2020 was our ability to offer monthly meetings uninterrupted throughout COVID. Without missing a beat, we transitioned seamlessly from offering meetings at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum to the Zoom platform on the Internet. Thanks to Dave Chisholm, our meeting chair, and Chris Teron, our meeting tech and organizer, for making this happen. Many thanks also to Jenna Hinds at the National Office for providing the technical guidance and support for getting us launched.

I know many of you will agree with me that our monthly meetings are a source of pride. The meetings are brimming with interesting content delivered by a diverse group of presenters from inside and outside the RASC. The monthly astro-images from members tell many stories of long nights filled with wonder and awe. We are truly fortunate to be able to continue this wonderful tradition at the Ottawa Centre without interruption during a very challenging time.

Public Outreach - International Astronomy Day

International Astronomy Day (IAD) on May 2nd was different this year. Due to the pandemic, it would have been reasonable to expect that IAD would not be celebrated this year. IAD has always been a public event, where large groups of people look through our member’s telescopes. Clearly this was not possible this year. Instead of letting this event pass, Jim Thompson did something different, something that turned out to be a resounding success.

Some background first - Jim is a member of the Ottawa Valley Astronomy & Observers Group (OAOG) as well as the RASC. Within the OAOG, Jim has organized many successful IAD events attracting thousands of people every year. To ensure we celebrated IAD this year, Jim reached out to Chris Teron and proposed a virtual IAD program with Zoom. Chris embraced the idea and soon Jim had recruited many volunteers to share views of the daytime and nighttime sky on May 2nd with their telescopes through Zoom, as well as offering a series of presentations. The program was designed so that backup presentations would be delivered in case of cloudy skies.

Ultimately, Jim organized a full program of presenters including Bojan Scepanovic, Jean-Sebastien Gaudet, Attilla Danko, Pierre Martin, Rob Millard, Paul Klauninger, Simon Hanmer, Jim Sofia and Lance McIntosh. Jim was also a presenter. To ensure the Zoom program ran smoothly, Chris Teron, Dave Chisholm and Doug Fleming volunteered to be co-hosts throughout the day. They relayed questions to speakers and ensured the program moved forward without interruption.

The entire session was recorded and is available to watch on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv47YspfAFAa0LHnE_sm4Fdu6WvElFMxi or https://astrodayottawa.weebly.com/ .Thanks to Paul Sadler for professionally editing and Mick Wilson for webmaster support.

This was an extraordinary achievement. Jim and Chris estimate that we reached 800 people from across Canada. People were connected together in a challenging time. While many people deserve thanks, I would like to especially acknowledge Jim Thompson for his dedication and drive, ensuring that we celebrated International Astronomy Day. Thank you, Jim!

Public Outreach – Dave Chisholm

You may recall my report last year on the extraordinary outreach achievement of Dave Chisholm. He delivered many presentations to Cubs, Scouts, Pathfinders, school groups and various adult groups. He continued on his torrid pace in 2020. Here are the stats from his work to date. Notice how he transitioned from in-person programs to online programs as the pandemic arrived.

Count

Date

Group

Adults

Youth

Type

1

January 6, 2020

Seniors

25

0

In Person

2

February 11, 2020

Beavers

5

21

In Person

3

February 19, 2020

Cubs

5

22

In Person

4

February 24, 2020

Guides

2

30

In Person

5

February 25, 2020

Cubs

5

17

In Person

6

March 2, 2020

Beavers

5

20

In Person

7

March 5, 2020

Scouts

5

30

In Person

8

April 15, 2020

Pathfinders

1

11

Virtual

9

April 22, 2020

Scouts & Venturers

3

19

Virtual

10

April 27, 2020

Sparks

3

13

Virtual

11

May 5, 2020

Scouts

3

11

Virtual

12

May 11, 2020

Cubs

3

12

Virtual

13

May 12, 2020

Beavers

3

17

Virtual

14

May 13, 2020

Cubs & Scouts

4

14

Virtual

15

May 14, 2020

Cubs

2

10

Virtual

16

May 19, 2020

Beaver

2

10

Virtual

17

May 21, 2020

Scouts

3

6

Virtual

18

May 25, 2020

Cubs

2

13

Virtual

19

May 27, 2020

Cubs

3

17

Virtual

20

June 2, 2020

Cubs

3

13

Virtual

21

June 9, 2020

Scouts

3

12

Virtual

22

June 17, 2020

Cubs & Scouts

2

11

Virtual

23

September 22, 2020

Beavers

3

9

Virtual

24

September 29, 2020

Cubs (London)

6

14

Virtual

25

October 5, 2020

Beavers

3

10

Virtual

26

October 12, 2020

Pathfinders (Kingston)

3

12

Virtual

27

October 13, 2020

Scouts

3

17

Virtual

28

November 3, 2020

Cubs

2

15

Virtual

29

November 18, 2020

Grade 6 Class Kanata

1

28

Virtual

30

November 20, 2020

Beavers (Montréal)

3

11

Virtual

31

November 20, 2020

Cubs (Montréal)

3

8

Virtual

32

November 23, 2020

Cubs

2

14

Virtual

32

November 30, 2020

Scouts (Montréal)

3

10

Virtual

TOTALS (7 In Person, 26 Virtual) – 601 people reached

124

477

 

On behalf of all Ottawa Centre members, thank you Dave for touching so many people. I am sure they will carry warm memories of your astronomy talk for the rest of their lives.

Public Stargazing

Due to the pandemic risks presented to our members and guests, we did not host a public stargazing program in 2020. This is indeed very sad, and may very well be the 1st time this has happened since the Ottawa Centre was founded in 1906. Our public star parties have always been very popular and have touched countless numbers of people in Ottawa and region. Paul Sadler, our star party coordinator for the past few years, took the program to new heights. As a testament to his organizational skills, he received many inquiries this year about the status of the stargazing program and when it will return.

I am confident that our public stargazing program will come back with a roar after the pandemic is behind us. We have been approached by several groups outside the RASC that are interested in partnering with us in new, innovative ways.

Member Programs

In late spring, many of us had the pleasure of attending an online astrophotography session hosted by Paul Klauninger. Paul is widely known in the Ottawa Centre for his dazzling astro-images that he shares at monthly meetings. He is a very experienced astrophotographer and a gifted communicator. Paul spent several months preparing for the workshop and it clearly showed. Course feedback was entirely positive.

In late summer, Paul Sadler hosted a Telescope Clinic for members. Paul polled members for their needs which culminated in a hands-on evening where social-distancing was respected due to the pandemic.

I continue to be amazed at the calibre of our Centre’s newsletter AstroNotes. Editor Gordon Webster has ensured that each issue is full of interesting content for members. While there are many things on the Internet that compete for our time, I still find AstroNotes an essential read for Ottawa Centre members.

Gordon was also very active organizing member-only star parties at our Centre’s observatory site, Fred Lossing Observatory (FLO). Gordon organized several star parties and ensured that public health guidelines were respected.

Also, at FLO, Rick Scholes has continued to offer a series of training programs for members on the use of the 18-inch Dobsonian. Rick is the Director of the FLO site and is a driving force behind the ongoing enhancements of the site (more on this later).

I encourage all Ottawa Centre members to browse the Ottawa Centre website (www.ottawa.rasc.ca). Ottawa Centre webmaster Mick Wilson has been very active making a lot of under-the-cover enhancements to the website to ensure it remains stable and available to everyone. Two sections deserve special attention – the Observer Images section and the AstroNotes section. Observer images, shared at monthly meetings, are posted online. There is a powerful search tool to help find images. AstroNotes issues have also been professionally archived online.

Fred Lossing Observatory Site Enhancements

The FLO site and observing grounds are a major asset for Ottawa Centre members. The property is leased from our landlord, the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority (MVCA). A new 5-year lease was signed in March of this year with MVCA. Due to COVID restrictions imposed by the MVCA, the FLO grounds were closed from mid-March until mid-May. The clubhouse and 18-inch telescope reopened in mid-June.

Several upgrades to the FLO site were completed this year, including:

  • The addition of gravel to a 60-metre section of the access lane.

  • The expansion of the south observing mound to more than double its previous size. The mound was covered with topsoil and seeded with clover. A fence will be added at the perimeter and it will be open for use in spring 2021.

Last year a new SkyShed observatory was installed. A 14” Meade SCT was installed in the observatory. While it is working mechanically, there are alignment issues. Paul Klauninger and Tim Cole are investigating the problem. The pace of development has been slowed by COVID.

Last year a 6-inch refractor and silo observatory originally owned by Rolf Meier was moved to the FLO site. The observatory and observatory equipment were donated to the RASC Ottawa Centre by Rick Scholes.

We had engaged a contractor to pour a concrete pad and attach the silo observatory on top of it. However, the work schedule has been severely impacted by COVID. The new target date for installing the observatory is Spring 2021. After the observatory is in place, we plan to install a secure door as well as a better mechanism to rotate the dome.

We are also planning to upgrade the electrical panel on site. We will also dig a trench to lay a power line to the new north observing mound.

Rick Scholes deserves a lot of credit for the ongoing maintenance and improvements to the FLO site. Thank you, Rick.

Preserving the Dominion Observatory Site

As many of you know, the Dominion Observatory is a site of national scientific historic significance. We are fortunate in the Ottawa Centre to have a talented group (Sharon Odell, Douglas O’Brien, Neil O’Brien, Michael Wolfson) who are very determined to preserve the Dominion Observatory facilities, its contents and the site from the encroachment of a future super hospital.

This group continues to be active and are currently exploring obtaining Heritage Canada status for the site and all facilities. To assist them with this effort, they recently obtained the material used by the committee that successful obtained Heritage Canada status for the David Dunlop Observatory in Toronto.

I encourage all members and non-members, who are interested in the work of this group, to reach out to them and provide support.

In Memoriam - Lloyd Albert Higgs (June 21, 1937 - July 20, 2020)

In July of this year, we learned of the passing of former Ottawa Centre member Lloyd Higgs. Gordon Webster wrote a beautiful tribute to Dr. Higgs in the August 2020 AstroNotes. I reproduce it here.

Lloyd was born in New Brunswick, attended the University of New Brunswick and went to Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, receiving his D.Phil. degree in 1961. He then began his career in research with the Radio and Electrical Engineering Division of NRC in Ottawa

As well as being a Rhodes Scholar, a Queen’s Scout, and an esteemed Rotarian Dr. Higgs was one of Canada’s most respected astronomers.

Dr. Higgs joined the RASC shortly after moving to Ottawa and took an active part in a number of capacities, including a term as Ottawa Centre president 1971-72. Always an enthusiastic supporter of the RASC, he contributed many scientific papers and reviews to the Society's publications and edited the Journal from 1976 to 1980. His election as the Society's Second Vice-President in 1984 led to a term as President in 1988-90, during which time he spoke at meetings of nearly all the twenty-two Centres. He received the Service Award in 1983 and as sited in the citation “few professional astronomers have been willing or able to commit themselves so whole-heartedly to the Society, yet he always gave the impression that he was the beneficiary.” On stepping down from his editorial role, Higgs wrote, "the frequent contacts with enthusiastic amateur astronomers were refreshing experiences which never failed to re-kindle my own flagging spirits." Undoubtedly many amateur members feel the same way about their encounters with him.

Thanks

I am at the end of my two-year term as Ottawa Centre President. I have enjoyed the experience and worked hard to continue to develop our Centre. I can assure you that your Council is filled with very talented people who shared my aspirations for a bright future for our Centre.

I’d like to welcome Stephen Nourse as the next President of the Ottawa Centre. He is a thoughtful, experienced leader and very resourceful. I wish I could share with you some promising news that he shared with me, but I will let him do that. All the best, Stephen!

On behalf of Ottawa Centre Council, I wish everyone a healthy and happy 2021 with clear skies and lots of observing opportunities.

Mike Moghadam
RASC Ottawa Centre President

December 1, 2020

Financial Statements

Annual Awards

Paul Comision Observer of the YearPaul Klauninger

Rolf Meier Planetary Observer of the YearTaras Rabarskyi

 

Presentation of the Year – Jeremy Kuzub

AsrtoNotes Article of the Year – Taras Rabarskyi

Service Award – Rick Scholes

Service Award – Gordon Webster

Ottawa Skies

By Dave Chisholm

December 30 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark. This moon has also been known as the Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The morning of the 15th could also be nearly as active this year. The nearly new moon will ensure dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini but can appear anywhere in the sky.

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. The first quarter moon should set just after midnight leaving dark skies for what could be a good show. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor but can appear anywhere in the sky.

A conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn will take place on December 21. This rare conjunction of these two planets is known as a great conjunction. The last great conjunction occurred in the year 2000. The two bright planets will appear only 7 arc minutes of each other in the night sky. They will be so close that they will appear to make a bright double planet. Look to the west just after sunset for this impressive and rare planetary pair.

Quadrantids Meteor Shower. The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak. It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003. The shower runs annually from January 1-5. It peaks this year on the night of the 2nd and morning of the 3rd. The waning gibbous moon will block out most of the faintest meteors this year. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

Mercury

Rise/Set 05:20/15:51 -> 08:25/16:46

Not Visible

 

Venus

Visible before sunrise.

Rise/Set 04:58/15:02 -> 06:14/14:58

 

Mars

Visible in the evening and through the night.

Rise/Set 13:54/02:49 -> 12:13/01:46

 

Jupiter

Visible in the early evening.

Rise/Set 10:45/19:36 -> 09:07/18:12

Conjunction with Saturn, December 21st

Saturn

Visible in the early evening.

Rise/Set 10:51/19:48 -> 09:03/18:06

Conjunction with Jupiter, December 21st

 

Uranus

Visible all night.

Rise/Set 14:42/04:36 -> 12:42/02:35

 

Neptune

Visible all evening.

Rise/Set 12:59/00:14 -> 11:02/22:14

Hot Topic!

 

What follows is a collection of email exchanges on the topic of leaving your mount outside in the cold weather. We thought it worth clipping and publishing it here in case you missed it or dismissed it first time around.

 

Recently on the list-serve, Richard asked a very important question many of us are facing at this time of the year:

Does anyone leave their mount outdoors over the winter? My mount lives on a tripod on my covered apartment balcony right now, but I'm a little worried about the cold doing bad things to my Synta Glue. I'm running an HEQ5. Anybody have experience with this?

Jim replied:

I left my Orion Atlas EQ/G (same as Skywatcher EQ6) outside all year for many years, and presently leave the EQ8 that has replaced it outside as well. They are in a naturally ventilated removeable enclosure to keep wind and rain off, but they are at ambient temperature all the time, even when I am using them. I have had no issues. If anything, it is bad to bring your mount outside into the cold and then back into your warm moist house after you are done. Doing so will result in condensation on the inside of your mount which will eventually result in an electrical short.

He then added regarding the possibility of stiff and brittle cables:

Yes, standard cabling gets pretty stiff at -5C or colder. I leave lots of slack and have strain relief near where the cables connect to the mount or camera. I also route my cables as close to the mount's axes of rotation as possible to minimize the amount the cables have to move when the mount moves. Power cables and USB cable casing material seems to be pretty good for robustness (i.e., does not tend to crack when frozen), but commercial grade Cat 5/6 cabling has a very thin outer sheath that is easy to crack if you try to flex it too much in the cold.

Oscar also replied thus:

Both mounts I own live in my SkyShed Pod, which although not "outdoors" as in not exposed to the raw elements, is not climate controlled in any way. My CGEM-DX stands always set up and an HEQ5 sits on the shelf for when I want to set up in the field with a smaller telescope. Aside from some small amount of rusting on exposed steel parts (some screw heads mostly) I haven't noticed any adverse effects to the operation or aesthetics of either mount in the four or so years they've lived in the observatory. Your mileage may vary obviously :) but this is my experience at least.

Hani noted:

Don't leave my equipment out when its below zero. The reason is cables will eventually get brittle and crack. Metal parts will rust. Anything plastic will crack. I know a cover will help but humidity will eventually get in.

If the metals are all aluminium and stainless steel, no problem. Screws that are zinc plated start to have surface rust.

USB and power cables will degrade.

I do have one silicon USB cable I have used for three years and its fine but the regular USB cable and power cables break at the point where the wire enters the connector.

Jim then added:

Rusting has to do with improper ventilation. If you simply throw a tarp or fitted cover over your scope at the end of the night, then all the dew or frost that settled during your session will be trapped under the cover and eventually corrode your mount and scope. A rigid enclosure with proper ventilation will prevent this from happening.

I have left all my cables, mount, and telescopes outside for the past 5 or 6 years and the only failure I have had is a cracked outer casing on a Cat 6 cable. One additional thing to note though is the mount hand controllers do not like cold weather. The LCD displays stop functioning below a certain temperature. I don't have this issue because I connect the mount to a laptop when in use. If you intend to use a hand controller, you will need to keep it warm.

JS contributed with this:

I don’t leave mine outside, but I use heat tape (usually used to keep water pipes from freezing) wrapped around the mechanicals to keep the mount warm when I’m using it in cold weather. My Advanced-GT dec axis seizes when it’s below freezing.

Doug added this:

Like many, I use those packages with the chemical hand warmers to great effect. Among other uses, they prevent my smart phone from ceasing up.

Most commercial mounts are relatively well designed. However, some DIY parts might suffer. For example.

Robert noted:

I cobble stuff together on an as-required basis - grabbing parts and materials that are "within reach". This DOES cause problems. Most mount materials are aluminum, due to the relatively low weight to stiffness ratio. However, if you add a part made of brass or steel - you will have a problem.

The aluminum material has a significant galvanic voltage compared to the steel or brass. In the presence of moisture - from condensation or water leakage, this will corrode the aluminum parts in contact.

The solution is to keep the parts dry or remove the brass and steel gadgets you may have mounted on the aluminum when not in use.

Peter added to this practical discussion with:

I have been using two "100W equivalent" household LED lightbulbs (on each side of my mount) under a “Telegizmo 365” cover and a blanket in order to leave my equipment outdoors and, importantly, keep any condensation at bay (see attached photos). These lightbulbs typically draw 13W electrical and assuming 65% conversation to thermal it is like having two continuous 8W dew heaters on the job. I have spray painted the bulbs to keep the stray light down and they are plugged into an outdoor GFCI socket using an extension cord. The lightbulb bases are warm to the touch. So far, so good - I have had no issues with any condensation/frost buildup and have been using this setup for several years now. Without some form of continuous mild heating a tarp (alone) is a moisture trap and is certainly not advisable as mentioned previously.

I would bring your hand controller indoors and be aware that the HEQ5 tripod cast iron leg joints are prone to corrosion - in the past I have sealed these up with electrical tape to prevent condensation collecting inside these joints.

Peter added some photos to illustrate:

 

Mike added

In some cases, people have completely changed the type of grease used on their mounts to a thinner synthetic grease. I suggest going to cloudy nights, there have been many discussions on the subject over the years. With stepper motors and belts grease may not be a factor.

 

JS responded

I replaced the grease in my mount with “Superlube” Silicone grease with PTFE as suggested on Cloudy Nights. It does feel smoother in movement.

 

Robert shared the following

I think some tinkerers out there may be interested in this table of "galvanic voltages" that may help you avoid or minimize corrosion problems.

Galvanic Corrosion Page last modified on: 01/05/2020 06:34:01 Whenever different metals are positioned in an electrolyte within close proximity to one another preferential corrosion becomes an important factor to be aware of. Galvanic corrosion typically attacks junction areas of dissimilar metals and occurs when the following three conditions are met. • Condition 1: Metals must have a galvanic incompatibility (voltage difference - see below table). • Condition 2: An electrolyte must be present (water is a good example). • Condition 3: There must be an electrical conducting path between the metals. The galvanic series chart below shows metals and their electrochemical voltage range (relative activity in flowing sea water). A typical rule of thumb is that voltage differences of 0.2 Volts or more suggest a galvanic corrosion risk. Generally speaking the further apart, the metals in the galvanic series the greater the risk of corrosion, with the metal being of least noble (Anodic) class typically corroding. It should be noted that although stainless steels are generally in the more noble or cathodic region in the series, studies have shown that stainless steels exhibit a different voltage range in crevices or stagnant and poorly aerated water (these values are shown in brackets).

Galvanic Corrosion Risk The below table can be used as a quick guide to select compatible metals. Where two materials meet in a green region the corrosion potential can be thought of negligible, meaning, a good combination. Materials that meet in the red zone however should be avoided or used with caution.

Additional Resources 1. C. Houska. Stainless Steels in Architecture, Building and Construction: Guidelines for Corrosion Prevention. Nickel Institute, USA. 1965. Publised article. 2. Euro Inox. Stainless Steel in Contact with Other Metallic Materials, volume 10. Belgium. 2005. Print. 3. R. Baboian. R.S. Treseder. NACE Corrosion Engineer's Book. Texas. 2002. Print. 4. ResearchGate. (2014, March). Galvanic series of various materials in flowing seawater (2.5-4 m/s) at temperatures in the range from 5 to 30oC. [ upload Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Galvanicseries-of-various-materials-...

 

 

 

Monthly Challenge Objects

By Oscar Echeverri

Submitted Images

 

Wolf 359 in 3-D [New Horizons (left) and PK (right)], by Paul Klauninger

To use: copy image to a photo app or zoom in here for a larger view, then cross your eyes slightly for the effect.

 

 

From Gordon Webster we have;

The following sketches were all completed on the night of November 14 at the Member’s Star Party at the Fred Lossing Observatory (FLO). They were all done using my 12” Dobsonian and an 8mm eyepiece at 188x magnification. The sketches are done on white paper using an HD pencil and inverted and cleaned up in Corel PaintShop Pro.

NGC 7331 M 57

NGC 7619, 7623, 7626

NGC 7464? See note below

NGC 7464 – This one is a bit puzzling.

Several years ago, there was an article in the Sky & Telescope column GOING DEEP that focused on galaxy groups in Pegasus. The column is aimed at large scopes than my 12” but I like to push things, so I made up a series of POST IT note with the NGC numbers and posted them to the appropriate positions on my charts. Yes, I still use paper charts.

At the FLO star party, I spotted the post it and realised I had not observed this group yet. The group is located near Markab, and brighter NGC 7448. I entered NGC 7464 into the GOTO and when I looked in the eyepiece there was a faint fuzzy near the upper edge of the field of view. I centered it, studied it for a bit. Found the second galaxy and decided to sketch it.

On Sunday I was checking my sketches against the “eyepiece” view in SKY TOOLs to confirm what I had seen since I only found two of the three galaxies and that is when the confusion set in.

The EP I was using was an 8mm which yields 188x magnification. In my 13mm (115x) NGC 7448 & NGC 7464 are in the same field of view. To make things worse the star pattern on one side of the sketch better matched up with those near NGC 7448 than 7464 but there is only the one galaxy and I definitely saw two.

So, after lots of comparison and Google searches for images and sketches of both NGC 7448 and the NGC7464 group I have decided that this is indeed a sketch of NGC 7463 and NGC 7465. The target galaxy, NGC 7464 was not quite visible that night. Not surprising at MAG 14.4. It means this galaxy group will remain on my observing list for the next time I’m at the FLO or a darker site.

Bob Olson

M 51, The Scorpion

Double Cluster in Perseus

NGC 7331

M78

M 42, the Orion Nebula

Estelle’s Pick of the Month

 

The Library is closed until our physical meetings resume.

 

Carp Star Parties

 

We are looking for a Public Star Party Co-ordinator. If you are interested in taking on this fulfilling position please contact our new President, Stephen Nourse at president@ottawa.rasc.ca

FLO Star Party Dates for 2020

  • Our Ottawa Centre’s Members’ Star Parties at the FLO will continue this winter. If you haven’t attended before, be sure to mark at least one of these dates on your calendar. You are welcome to bring family members or a guest. The GO/NO GO call will be made on the Centre mailing list, about noon the day of the star party.

SUMMER & FALL DATES

  • November 14 – Waning Crescent, 29 days old, .01% illumination GO

  • December 12 – Waning Crescent, 27 days old, 4.2% illumination NO GO

  • January 16 – Waxing Crescent, 3 days old, 14.5% illumination

  • February 13 – Waxing Crescent, 2 days old, 4.5% illumination

  • March 13 – Waxing Crescent, 30 days old, 0.3% illumination

Next Meeting

7:30 PM Friday January 8, 2021 This will be A VIRTUAL MEETING ON ZOOM. Watch for email updates. Note there will be no $4.00 parking fee. The meeting runs until 9:30 pm

PLUS: all our regular meeting features: Ottawa Skies, 10-minute Astronomy News Update, Observation Reports and, sadly, no Door Prizes!

All RASC monthly meetings are free and open to members and non-members alike. Refreshments will be available, and this will be a wonderful opportunity to meet new friends who share a common interest and chat in a relaxed, stimulating, and fun environment.  Please join us!

Centre Information

To subscribe (or unsubscribe) to our members-only discussion list (rascottawa@googlegroups.com ) please contact secretary@ottawa.rasc.ca .

The Ottawa Centre 2020 Council
President: Stephen Nourse (president@ottawa.rasc.ca)
Vice President: Dave Chisholm
Secretary: Chris Teron (secretary@ottawa.rasc.ca)
Treasurer: David Parfett (treasurer@ottawa.rasc.ca)
Centre Meeting Chair: Dave Chisholm (meetingchair@ottawa.rasc.ca)
Councillors: Carmen Rush, Gerry Shewan, Jim Sofia
National Council Representatives: Paul Sadler, OPEN
Past President: Mike Moghadam

2020 Appointed Positions
Membership: Art Fraser
Star Parties: OPEN
Fred Lossing Observatory: Rick Scholes (flo@ottawa.rasc.ca)
Light Pollution Abatement: OPEN
Public Outreach Coordinator: Jean-Sebastien (JS) Gaudet
Hospitality: Art & Anne Fraser
Stan Mott Astronomy Library: Estelle Rother
Ted Bean Telescope Library: Darren Weatherall
Webmaster: Mick Wilson (webmaster@ottawa.rasc.ca)
AstroNotes Editors: Gordon Webster & Douglas Fleming (astronotes@ottawa.rasc.ca)