AstroNotes 1979 December Vol: 18 issue 12

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The Newsletter Magazine of the Ottawa Centre of the RASC
Vol. 18, No. 12 $2.00 a year December, 1979
Editor.......Rolf Meier.......77 Meadowlands Dr.W.. .224 -1200
Addresses....Jacqui Tapping...61 Oval Dr., Aylmer.. .684 -1186
Circulation..Barry Matthews...2237 Iris St..... ....225-6600
EDITORIAL
There is a show on a local radio station which must be
removed from the air. Without reading any further, many
readers can already guess that I am referring to the Astrology
Show, which is broadcast on CHEZ-106 at 11:30 on weekdays.
This show began in the spring, at which time I called the
station manager to register my complaint with the show. He
told me that the show was being done mainly for fun, and for
the entertainment of the audience. I warned him that such
topics are dangerous, because they are misleading to the
general public, pretending to give credibility to a totaly
unproven, in fact, disproven concept.
It has gone far enough. In attempting to give credence
to astrology, the makers of the show are using astronomical
facts, which are, of course, true. They give detailed
positions of the sun, moon, and planets, and explain the
motions of these bodies in our solar system. What really
maddens me is that they then use these facts to try to explain peoples' behaviour, and give them advice on their daily
lives based on the motions and positions of these bodies.
We know, of course, that there is absolutely no mechanism to
explain the "advice" that they derive. It is this mixing of
fact with pure nonsense which must be stopped. People are
beginning to believe them because they appear to be using
real. and scientific facts to support their absurd claims.
What Is perhaps worse is that they are giving the science of
astronomy a bad name by combining it with the illusion of
astrology.
Please help to get this show off the air. Complain to
the radio station. A phone call to the station manager is
good if you are articulate and can hold your own in an
argument. Otherwise, write a letter. Get your friends to
write letters. Whatever you can do.
ISSN 0048-8682OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - NOVEMBER 2
Reneé Meyer and Mary Geekie
Chairman Robt Dick opened the meeting at 8:17 pm .
Rob mentioned that IRO users' fees are still due. Copies
pertaining to Dr. John Percy's timings for occultations
of Saturn's satellites will be available next meeting.
Rob then proceeded with the elections. The new executive
is as follows:
Chairman:
Vice Chairman:
Asteroids:
Variables:
Instrumentation:
Deep Sky & Photography:
Meteors:
Radio:
Planets, Moon, and Occult: Brian Burke
Solar: Bill Donaldson
Recorders: Renee Meyer and Mary Geekie
Rob Dick
Pierre Lemay
Dave Fedosiewich
Rob McCallum
Pierre Lemay
Rolf Meier
Frank Roy
Ken Tapping
Dave Fedosiewich made another request for funds for
a guiding eyepiece.
Barry Matthews introduced Don Alexander from
Montreal. Don has facilities for aluminizing mirrors up
to 16 inches in diameter.
Rob Dick commented that he has requested and received
a 12-inch flat mirror from Coulter Optical at the incredibly
low price of $200.
Chip Weist and Ken Tapping delivered this month's
theme talk dealing with ionospheric variations during a
solar eclipse; more specifically the drop of intensity of
radio signals during the eclipse. By bouncing signals
between Fort Collins, Texas, Kearny, Nebraska, Bruce
Peninsula, Ontario, and Almonte, they were able to determine the height of the ionospheric reflection point at
various locations. Due to the effect of the ionosphere
variation during the 1963 solar eclipse, one man in Quebec
could receive a Boston radio station hundreds of miles
away.
Frank Roy talked about meteoroids. He stated that
meteors often originate from the asteroid belt and range
in size from micrometers to boulders. He explained various
terms relating to meteors and their observation. In 1966,an intense Leonid shower occured, with 1000 per hour
being spotted. A fireball was observed by several people
earlier before the meeting, around 7:20 pm. It was heading
northwest at a magnitude of -8, and a green tint was noted.
Brian Burke related to the group several coming lunar
occultations:
November 5: ZC 669 mag 4 disappearance 20:12.0 EST
reappearance 21:12.1 EST
ZC 671 mag 3.6 disappearance 20:13.6 EST
reappearance 21:09.9 EST
November 6: ZC 692 disappearance 00:02.8 EST
reappearance 01:18.8 EST
Brian would appreciate any observations of these.
They should have longitude and latitude to within 1 second.
Observations should be timed to within 0.1 second, if
intended for any official purpose. In the planet review,
Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are all coming to opposition within a 19-day interval. On November 18, it will be possible
to photograph these planets in the same field, using a
50-mm lense and 35-mm camera. An exposure of 15 to 20
seconds is suggested. Jupiter and Mars by the middle of
the month will be rising at midnight; Saturn will be
rising 5 hours before sunrise. Saturn’s rings could be
seen edge on in late October. By mid-December, Mars
will be 1.6° above Jupiter. Much controversy followed
as article 13 of the revised constitution was discussed.
Final vote will be held at the Annual Dinner Meeting,
November 16, 1979.
Doug George proceeded to deliver the night’s second
theme talk, dealing with computerized photometric observations of lunar occultations. The occultations create a
diffraction pattern light curve, which is displayed on a
screen by the microcomputer. The photomultiplier
measures the light intensity as it changes quickly. Doug
demonstrated the entire process by passing a comb in front
of a light source.
Fedosiewich fashions for winter at IRO proceeded.
Shorts and running shoes are out this year, while a downfilled jacket and aluminum foil socks are in. Among the
attractive accessories available this year are hats, track
pants, sweaters, mitts, boots, and mirrored sunglasses to
aid in dark-adaptation (not only that, but we can't see
where his eyes are looking). These fashions, clearly the
best and most versatile ever, were worn by cover-boyDave Fedosiewich.
Upon being elected astrophotography coordinator, Rolf
Meier displayed some excellent celestial slides. Among
the assortment were M 42, M 31, NGC 253, NGC 2024, and
NGC 2023. Rolf also informed the group of the fairly
recent discovery of a possible birth of a star in the M 42
region due to an outburst in the water line.
Jim Zillinsky followed with a report on auroral
activity.
Barry Matthews reminded the group not to send mirrors
for aluminizing in their cells, but rather in a tight
wooden box, and include your name and address both inside
and outside the box. The address of Don Alexander
appeared in last month's Astronotes.
Rob Dick adjourned the meeting at an undisclosed time.
At this we'd like to wish the group and all the starfolk of the earth a Messier Christmas, Helix Hannukah, and
a Happy Nova Year! Don'f forget: Star Trek, the Motion
Picture is coming soon to a theatre near you! Get those
projects ready for the Halifax General Assembly.
10 YEARS AGO IN ASTRONOTES
from the December, 1969 issue: "The first men on the moon
are due in Ottawa any day now and it is to be hoped that
they will get the warm and cordial reception they so
richly deserve. Obviously they must have had a bellyful of
that sort of thing during their world-girdling tour and
are probably longing most of all to get home and be themselves again.
To Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins
we express our profound admiration and thanks for the
greatest step mankind has ever taken."
also from the December, 1969 issue, discussing the new
Variable Star Award: "The award will be presented annually
by the Variable Star Coordinator to the individual with
the highest total of observations (excluding the coordinator himself) for the year. Should the Variable Star
section ever become inactive the Award should be given to
the person who is deemed by the Chairman to have contributed greatly in stellar astronomy (i.e. nova, comets,
deep-sky, or double stars)."68TH ANNUAL AAVSO MEETING Rolf Meier
Ottawa members Doug Welch, Jon Buchanan, Noeline
Butler, and Rolf Meier attended the AAVSO meeting at
Cambridge, Massachusetts on the weekend of October 26-28.
Our time-space coordinates coincided on Friday evening
at 6:30 in Boston via US Air, Air Canada, and Delta airlines,
We were met by Ann Piening, a student at Harvard University,
who kindly provided the use of her residence.
We arrived in time for an informal tour of the
observatory atop Harvard-Smithsonian's Center for Astrophysics, the place where Dr. Brian Marsden works.
The main business day was Saturday, beginning with
our registration. The paper sessions were of interest.
Our own Dr. John Percy presented a paper on the RASC, and
its relationship to the AAVSO. Among other topics were
sunspots; microcomputers; aurora; deeps sky objects; mutual
events of Jupiter's and Saturn's satellites; and a large
number of papers on various variable stars. An enjoyable
banquet was held that evening. Awards were presented to
RASC members Warren Morrison and Gus Johnson, for their
discoveries of a nova and supernova respectively. The
post-banquet speaker was Dr. Leon Van Speybroeck of the
CAF "on the topic "Tour of Recent Einstein Observatory's
Results in x-ray Astronomy", the results of an orbiting
observatory.
"Sunday was spent at the Agassiz Station of Harvard
College Observatory, which operates a 1.5-m reflector as
well as a number of patrol cameras.
A weekend in the Cambridge-Boston area is highly
recommended, as this is a very historic area of America,
as well as a centre for higher education and recent
scientific work.
########
"TIME" Frank Roy
October 21/22 was the night of the maximum of the
Orionids. Four members were at Springhill for the occassion.
It was completely cloudy. We watched the high-power radar
display continuously. This is a 20-kW radar to observe
ionization caused by meteors, as the ionised trail reflects
radio waves.
Hundreds of meteors were observed with the radar. In
the graph of the number of meteors versus time, we can
clearly see that the rate is increasing as the radiantrises, the counts being made for 10-minute periods.
On the second graph, range vs. duration of trail is
plotted. It is clearly seen that the large majority of
meteors are short faint ones, less than 0.3 seconds. There
dosen't seem to be a correlation between range and duration.You may be wondering what "time" means. It is used
by a meteor observer when observing meteors in a group.
When someone cries "time", it means that they have seen a
meteor, and the observer calls out the shower and magnitude to the recorder.THE FEBRUARY 26, 1979 SOLAR ECLIPSE ON SHORT WAVE
Ken Tapping and Chip Wiest
For most of the inhabitants of the Ottawa area, the
February 26 eclipse of the sun was a bit of a non-event.
First, the eclipse was only partial in this part of Canada,
and second, due to heavy cloud and snow, few people saw
anything more than a slight darkening around noon.
However, 60 km above Ottawa, in the D-region , the sky
was clear and the eclipse was producing marked changes in
the atmosphere. The D-region is the lowest part of the
layer of ionized gases which constitute the ionosphere.
Although at this height the atmosphere is a pretty good
vacuum, what goes on there is of crucial importance to
radio communication. It is the multiple reflection of
radio waves between the ionosphere and the ground which
makes it possible for people on one side of the world to
talk to people on the other via short wave radio. The
ionosphere is produced by short-wavelength (UV and X-rays)
radiation from the sun. This interacts with the gases in
the upper atmosphere, breaking up their atoms to produce
ions and free electrons - a process called ionization. The
ionization so produced is removed by collisions with other
particles. A balance is achieved wherein the sun produces
ions at the same rate at which they recombine. If the sun
is obscured (by an eclipse or night), the production rate
falls and the concentration of ions decreases.
In the D-region, the frequent collisions between the
particles remove the ionization very rapidly. The D-region
plays no part in the reflection of radio waves having a
frequency higher than 2 MHz or so; however, it does absorb
part of the signal passing through it. When the density of
the ionization decreases the amount of absorption decreases.
At night the D-region completely disappears and signal
from distant transmitters can increase in strength by
orders of magnitude compared with the daytime level.
During an eclipse of the sun, the ionizing radiation
is reduced according to the extent by which the sun is
obscured by the moon. By monitoring the variations in the
strength of the signal from a distant short wave station
it is possible to follow the changes in the D-region. We
therefore have a tool by which we can investigate the
effects of the eclipse on a part of the upper atmosphere,
even if we can't see it.
With this in mind, the following experiment was set
up. On February 26, 1979, a radio receiver was set up tofigure 1
TIME (U.T.)
figure 2ECLIPSE AT SKIP POINT 1
ECLIPSE AT SKIP POINT 2
figure 3
-10-receive the transmissions from the WWV transmitter at
Fort Collins, Colorado, on a frequency of 5 MHz. The path
followed by the signal on its trip from Colorado to the
receiver, which was situated near Almonte, is shown in
figure 1. It can be seen that the signal was reflected by
the ionosphere at two points, labeled A and B in the
figure. Point A was over Kearny, Nebraska, and point b
over the Bruce Peninsula. The signal therefore made 4
transits through the D-region while travelling to and from
the point, higher up in the ionosphere, where it was
reflected. In the case discussed here, the eclipse path was
close enough to the signal path for a partial eclipse to
occur at one reflection point and then the other. The
smoothed record of the signal strength during the eclipse is
shown in figure 2. It can be seen that there are two peaks
in the curve. This is because 2 successive eclipses were
observed. The first peak corresponds to the changes in the
D-region over Kearny, Nebraska. Since "Bruce" was closer
to the path of totality, at that location the eclipse was
more complete and produced a more marked effect.
In this way, two eclipses were obtained for the price
of one. The "chemistry" of the D-region is very complex and
is not yet fully understood. However, simplifying assumptions make it possible to produce, for the above instance,
an approximate relationship between the signal strength
variations and the percentage change in the D-region
ionization level:
where x is the variation in signal strength in dB. It has
been assumed that only a single ionization process is
taking place and, as the eclipse occurred close to local
"noon", the D-region was, immediately before and after the
eclipse, in a state of equilibrium.
Using this relation the eclipse ionization profiles
were calculated for the Kearney and Bruce events. These
are shown in figure 3.
This experiment shows that, using simple equipment,
it is possible to make interesting observations which
yield a surprising amount of information for very little
effort.LUNAR OCCULTATIONS: VISUAL OBSERVATIONS Brian Burke
Observing lunar occultations visually allows the
amateur to make a valuable contribution to astronomy. The
equipment required is a telescope, an eyepiece that provider
medium power, a stopwatch, radio that receives CHU, and
possibly a tape recorder. The technique that I use is to
start the watch when the star disappears and then on a
given time signal from CHU, stop timing. The time of the
occultation is obtained be subtracting the elapsed time on
the stopwatch from the CHU time. The stopwatch must have
a precision of 0.1 seconds and the quoted error should be
plus or minus a half second. Another method is to use a
tape recorder so that both the CHU time signal and your
voice are recorded at the same time. This allows for
analysis at a later time.
Now for some results. Last month there were two
occultations on Nov. 5 and my results are shown below. The
predicted time is from the Observer's Handbook using the
Montreal time and correcting it for Ottawa.
ZC 669 predicted time 20:12:01.1 observed time 20:12:01.9
ZC 671 predicted time 20:13:33.0 observed time 20:13:19.9
(EST)
The observed time for the disappearance of ZC671 is
somewhat different from the predicted time, but there is
one point that must be realized. That is that the predictions are only given to the nearest tenth of a minute, but
for easy comparison here I converted the predicted times
to seconds. However, after taking this into account, the
observed time for ZC 671 is two tenths of a second earlier
that the predicted time, a substantial difference. If
anyone else obtained times for these two occultations,
please give them to me.
On the 30th of this month, Aldebaran will once again
be occulted by the moon. This occultation will be a
grazing one for an observer 160 km northwest of Ottawa,
but in Ottawa it will be a near graze. Aldebaran will
disappear on the dark limb at about 17:20 EST and reappear
on the bright limb approximately 25 minutes later. It is
advisable to commence observing at least a half hour before
since the prediction for near grazes is rather rough. Do
not forget to bring your observations to the next meeting.
#########
-12-OCCULTATION RECORDER Doug George
Several people have inquired about the actual photometer circuit used with the tone-encoding electronics.
For this reason I am including a slightly modified version
of a circuit which first appeared in an article by R. Dick
A, Fraser, and F. Lossing (Astronotes Vol. 16, No. 2, p.4)
In addition, I will discuss some more of the computer
aspects of the project.
The circuit is essentially the same (excluding the
photometer amp) as the original circuit except for the
low voltage power supply. I have replaced the original
zener diodes with IC regulators which can handle more
current. The most expensive parts of this circuit are the
transformers. The zener diodes can be bought cheaply at
a television parts store such as Canadian Admiral.
The five variable resistors in the photomultiplier
diagram are set so that changing the position of the
switch by one position will result in a 10 times change
in the meter reading.
The capacitor labelled TC is a time constant setter.
The value of this capacitor can be found experimentally,
but will certainly be very small, less than 0.1 uF. The
purpose of this capacitor is to filter out some of the
noise whcih the photomultiplier generates.
The computer end of this project is much simpler
that it might seem. I have found that the software to
read in the data and display it can be packed into a very
small area of memory, leaving as much room as possible
for data.
The first program, which simply reads data into
memory, is the simplest. This program will read data
every so often into memory, and continue to do so until
the end of memory is reached. My original version of the
program loaded a number each time the port signalled that
new data was ready. The problem with this, however, is
that a time-distortion effect occurs. With a change of
the input frequency, the frequency of input cycles also
change. The end result of this is that the computer
determines the events occuring at the higher input voltages of the photometer take longer than ones at lower
voltages. A little thought about how the frequency is
decoded should make this quite evident. The solution is
to sample the data in the port at a constant rate, independant on whether the data is new or old. This will
tend to stretch the apparent time of the low-input-levelROYAL ASTRONOMICAL
SOCIETY
OF CANADA
P.O. BOX 6222, OTTAWA
K2A 1T3
DECEMBER MEETING
DATE: Tuesday, Dec. 11 th
TIME: 8:15 p.m.
PLACE: Main Auditorium
National Research Council
100 Sussex Drive.
A FILM SHOW
At this meeting the following films will he shown:-
(a) "The Radio Sky", made by A.E.I. Company, U.K. in 1965
This is probably the best general interest film about radio astronomy
yet made. It starts with a small school radio telescope and progresses
to the largest instruments then available. A.E.I. had the contract for
constu c tion of the NRC 46 m. radio telescope at Algonquin Park, as well
as the 27 m. radio telescope at Chilbolton in Britain. Both these
telescopes are featured in the film, which discusses some of the
astronomical questions still with us.
(b) "To the Edge of the Universe", made by National Film Board
This film shows the first radio, very long baseline interferometry
experiment between the radio telescopes at Algonquin Park and at
Penticton, British Columbia. Canadians were the first successfully to
demonstrate this powerful astronomical technique. It is possible that a
member of the NRC. Long Baseline Interferometry Group will be present to
answer questions and to discuss the background to the experiment and the
film.
(c ) "The Radio View of the Universe", made by M.L.A.
Radio telescopes have revealed very different aspects of the universe
from those observed through optical telescopes. These are outlined in
this film.
VISITORS ARE WELCOME
President
R. Wlochowicz
996-9345
822-1799
Secretary
J. Tapping
684-1186events. In addition, this allows the decoder to be used
for very long-period signals, such as with the radio telescope. By reducing the sampling rate enormously, andignoring data between samples, the recording time of the
computer can be greatly increased.
The second program is a bit more complicated. This is
the program which will display the data. The exact nature
of this program will depend on the particular computer's
display devices. A program to display a graph on a terminal is simple (but agonizingly slow unles a hard copy is
desired). I am presently using my computer's video graphics. The software for this involves retrieving a word
from memory, generating an x-y coordinate for this word,
and placing a bit corresponding to this in a display
buffer. My particular system uses a memory map display
where the memory area is arbitrarily assigned to a block in
the main memory. This system reduces the amount of data
it is possible to store, of course, but all such systems
are a trade-off.
In addition, programs may be written to mathematically analyze the data, or to somehow modify it to improve
results, etc. Generally, such programs can be included in
either the input or output routines. If more extensive
manipulation of that data is required, data, can be easily
transferred to a larger computer through the use of a
modem or a magnetic storage medium.
I have not included actual programs, since the exact
format of these will vary widely from machine to machine.
If anyone has further questions about the actual programs,
or in the case of a different microprocessor the logic of
the programs, I may be reached at 224 -3611, or at a
meeting.
In future articles I shal discuss other (and more
straightforward) aspects of the project, including the
optical and observational areas.
# # # # # # # # #
THE COMET REPORT Dare Fedosiewich
During all of November, Comet Meier's magnitude has
been estimated at 11.8 as it continued to appraoch the
earth and at the same time recede from the sun. By early
December, at magnitude 11.7, the comet will become about
as bright as it will get. It is now observable best in
the morning sky with instruments of medical to large size.
Observations have been reported by amateurs John Bortle
-15--16-
COMET MEIER (1979i). Tracking Chart No. 508 by J. U. Gunter. Star Field by permission from Hans Vehrenberg's Photographic s t a r a t l a s p l a t e s 31, 51 and 52.
COMET MEIER
Perihelion: ω = 112°.608
1979 Oct 17.4 Ω = 297.200
q = 1.44450 AU i = 67.420at Brooks Observatory in New York, and Charles Morris at
Prospect Hill Observatory in Massachusetts, with coma
diameter estimates of 1.0 and 1.4 minutes of arc. A
short broad tail has been noted on some of the photographic plates. The accompanying chart was prepared from
IAU circular 3413, with elements derived by Brian Marsden
from precise positions reported by a number of observers.
Periodic Comet Reinmuth 1 (1979j) has been recovered
by G. Schwartz and C.Y. Shao with the 1.5-m reflector at
Harvard Observatory's Agassiz Station. The comet is
diffused and only weakly condensed. At magnitude 20.5, it
is moving through Cetus.
Let me know if I can be of assistance, and RASC
observations are always welcome. Se get all or any of
your comet sketches, positions, etc, to me for publication
in Astronotes, My address is 2145 Beaumont Rd., Ottawa,
K1H 5V2.
# # # # # # # # #
THE PLANETS IN DECEMBER Brian Burke
Mercury will be well-placed for observation all this
month. It will reach greatest elongation west on the 7th,
at which time it will be about 16° above the southeast
horizon at sunrise.
Venus is now becoming easier to see and by the middle
of the month it will be setting about 2 hours after the sun.
Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn will all be rising before
midnight by the 15th of this month. As I mentioned at last
month's meeting, these three planets will occupy a rather
small part of the sky for the next several months. A good
project is to photograph the configuration at least once
every week. All three planets should be able to fit within
the field of view of a 50-mm lens using a 35-mm camera. It
will be possible to take unguided photos of up to 30 seconds
exposure without any noticeable trailing. You should use
Ektachrome 200 film and the lens should be wide open. The
diagram (p.18)shows the configuration of the planets on the
15th of the month. On that date, Mars will be 1.6° north
of Jupiter and the 3 planets span 16½°. The moon will make
its presence known by joining the array between the 11th and
the 13th.
# # # # # # # # #
- 1 7 -Saturn Mars
J u p i t e r
Regulus
THE RADIO SUN Frank Roy
The sun is the most interesting source to observe
with a radio telescope because it is so powerful and
variable. As an example, take some recent recordings
made with the IRORI. Please,
On Friday, Nov. 8, the sun was very active, with
many bursts. A burst makes the fringes get bigger. As
a dramatic example of this, the recording of N ov. 2 shows,
an explosion by a sudden rise in the fringe, amplitude.
At IRORI we have two cylinders separated by
approximately 150 metres. At the celestial equator the
sky moves 15° per hour.
Our antenna beamwidth is calculated by the equation:
57 lambda
where lambda is the wavelength, 1.25m
and D is the separation of the antennas, 15Cm
This works out to approximately 0.5°.
What this means is that our radio telescope resolves
the sun. If the sun is quiet it will not show up on the
chart recorder, since 0.5° moves by in about 2 minutes,
the fringe width. As an example of this, Tuesday, Nov 13
was a quiet day, but in the morning there was some activity. In the afternoon the sun did not register on the
chart. That same day Jim Zilinsky, who is operating at
230 MHz, saw very minimal activity in the morning but
registered activity for the rest of the day.
The radio sun at 435 MHz has been way up and still on
the increase. If you study the graph you will notice that-2 0 -
CHART NO. 30 0 0 5ZDOct. 26 was very strong. I have seen no aurora recently,
but the skies have been cloudy lately.
There will be no more data from IRORI from the sun
because the antennas can now only "see" active regions
on the sun. We outdid ourselves!INDEX TO ASTRONOTES VOL. 18 (1979)
Issues: 12
Pages: 192
COMETS, ASTEROIDS, NOVAE
COMET BRADFIELD, 1979c; Sept; 2
MINOR PLANET PROGRAM; Dave Fedosiewich; Jan; 3
MINOR PLANETS FOR FEBRUARY; Dave Fedosiewich; Feb; 11
MINOR PLANETS FOR APRIL; Dave Fedosiewich; Apr; 13
MINOR PLANETS FOR MAY; Dave Fedosiewich; M ay; 3
MINOR PLANETS FOR JUNE; Dave Fedosiewich; June; 19
MINOR PLANETS FOR SEPTEMBER; Dave Fedosiewich; Sept;
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
RECENT IAU CIRCULARS
Dave Fedosiewich
Dave Fedosiewich
Dave Fedosiewich
Dave Fedosiewich
Dave Fedosiewich
Dave Fedosiewich
Jan; 5
Feb; 11
Apr; 11
May; 2
June; 12
Sept; 13
Dave Fedosiewich Nov: 6
SOME COMETS ON COMMENT MEIER; Rob McCallum ; Oct;
THE COMET REPORT; Dave Fedosiewich; Nov; 14
THE COMET REPORT: Dave Fedosiewich; Dec; 15
UPDATE ON COMET MEIER; Dave Fedosiewich; Jan; 5
17
DEEP SKY
DEEP SKY; Rolf Meier; Jan; 4
DEEP SKY; Rolf Meier; Feb; 10
DEEP SKY OBSERVING; Dave Fedosiewich; Sept; 11
GLOBULAR CLUSTERS TO OBSERVE; Rolf Meier; June; 6
ECLIPSE
A REFLECTING IDEA ABOUT SHADOW BANDS; Brian Burke; Jan; 10
OTTAWA ECLIPSE '79; Bill Hunter, et al; Apr; 7
PHOTOGRAPHING THE ECLIPSE; Fred Lossing; Feb; 7
THE FEBRUARY 26, 1979 SOLAR ECLIPSE ON S H O E WAVE;
Ken Tapping and Chip Wiest; Dec; 8
THE RADIO ECLIPSE; Frank Roy; Apr; 5
TO ECLIPSE BY TRAIN; Robert Dick; Apr; 8
EDITORIALS
On the earth's climate; Feb; 1
On the General Assembly; Apr; 1
On the Astrology Show; Dec; 1
-22-HISTORY AND MYTH
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE OTTAWA CENTRE’S 40-cm TELESCOPE;
Fred Lossing; Jan; 7
CONSTELLATIONS; Frank Roy; Jan; 14
10 YEARS AGO IN ASTRONOTES; Mar; 13
10 YEARS AGO IN ASTRONOTES; Nov; 6
10 YEARS AGO IN ASTRONOTES; Dec; A
INSTRUMENTATION
CLEANING ALUMINIZED TELESCOPE MIRRORS; Fred Lossing; Mar; 7
IRO RADIO TELESCOPE REPORT; Ken Tapping; Feb; 13
IRO RADIO TELESCOPE; Ken Tapping; Apr; 16
IRORI UPDATE; Frank Roy; Oct; 12
LOW FREQUENCY ENCODER; Frank Roy; June; 13
MIRROR ALUMINIZING; Nov; 16
OCCULTATION RECORDER; Doug George; Dec; 13
RADIO TELESCOPE REPORT; Ken Tapping; Mar; 11
RADIO TELESCOPE REPORT; Ken Tapping; July; 14
RECORDING LUNAR OCCULTATIONS; Doug George; Nov; 7
SILVERING A MIRROR; Bill Donaldson; Feb; 10
MEETINGS. CONVENTIONS. AND STAR NIGHTS
ANNUAL DINNER MEETING; Jan; 1
ANNUAL DINNER MEETING; Oct; A
ANNUAL DINNER MEETING; Nov; 17
CENTRE MEETING - FEBRUARY 1; Brian Burke; Mar; 2
DOWN THE ROAD FROM IRO; Robert Dick; Sept; A
FEBRUARY AND MARCH CENTRE MEETINGS; Apr; 3
LONDON ON $40 A DAY; Doug Welch; June; A
OBSERVER’S GROUP MEETING - DECEMBER 1, 1978; Renee Meyer
and Mary Geekie; Jan; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - JANUARY 5, 1979; ibid; Feb; 2
OBSERVER’S GROUP MEETING - FEBRUARY 2; ibid; Mar; 1
OBSERVER’S GROUP MEETING - MARCH 2; ibid; Apr; 2
OBSERVER’S GROUP MEETING - APRIL 6; ibid; May; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - MAY A; ibid; July; 3
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - JUNE 1; ibid; July; 5
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - JULY 6; ibid; Aug; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - AUGUST 3; ibid; Sept; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - SEPTEMBER 7; ibid; Oct; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - OCTOBER 5; ibid; Nov; 3
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - NOVEMBER 2; ibid; Dec; 2
SEVENTH ANNUAL DEEP SKY WEEKEND; Oct; A
SEVENTH ANNUAL DEEP SKY WEEKEND; Nov; 5
TELESCOPE MAXING WORKSHOP; Jan; 6TELESCOPE MAKING WORKSHOP; Pierre Lemay; Apr; 4
THE 1979 STELLAFANE MEETING; Aug; 1
68TH ANNUAL AAVSO MEETING; Rolf Meier; Dec; 5
STELLAFANE PLANS FOR THIS YEAR; June; 11
METEORS
FROM TOUR TO OBSERVATION; Frank Roy; Sept; 3
QUADRANTID METEORS OBSERVED; Frank Roy; Feb; 5
THE METEOR OBSERVING PROGRAM IN OTTAWA; Rob McCallum; Sept; 9
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Jan; 13
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Feb; 12
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Mar; 13
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Apr; 11
"TIME"; Frank Roy; May; 5
"TIME"; Frank Roy; June; 21
"TIME"; Frank Roy; July; 13
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Sept; 11
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Oct; 8
"TIME"; Frank Roy; Dec; 5
MISC
ASTRONOTES: A REVIEW; Frank Roy; June; 21
AWARDS FOR 1978; Feb; 4
CARTOONS; July; 15
CLOUDS AWAY OR MURPHY'S BACKFIRE; Dave Fedowiew ich; Apr; 9
DR. C.S. BEALS; R. Wlochowicz
FROM THE CHAIR; Robert Dick; Oct; 4
FROM THE CHAIRMAN; Rob Dick; June; 2
HOW TO SEE FAINT OBJECTS; July; 17
INDEX TO ASTRONOTES VOL. 18 (1979); Dec; 22
IRO FEE$ DUE; Rob Dick; Apr; 5
IT'S A FAR WALK; Brian Burke; Nov; 18
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR; Mar; 11
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR; Nov; 1
LIBRARY; Robert Dick; Sept; 18
LOST AND HOPING TO FIND; Robt Dick; Sept; 4
OFFICERS AND COUNCIL - 1979; May; 6
OBSERVER'S GROUP EXECUTIVE; June; 1
POMPEII IN PARADISE; Apr; 17
RING AROUND THE PLANET; Larc Saang; Mar; 14
SONG OF A SPACESHIP COMMANDER; Karen Campbell; Apr; 13
THE AGAA; Pierre Lemay; Apr; 4
THE LI'L R.A.S.C.'ALS; Jan; 14
TORONTO CENTRE ECLIPSE PLANS (SOLAR ECLIPSE OF FEB 16 '80);
from Astronomy London; Apr; 17VICE-CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW - 1978; Ken lapping; Mar; 3
WANTED - GOOD ASTRONOMICAL SLIDES; Nov; 15
WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND; Brian Burke; July; 1
WHAT NOT TO DO WHEN ATTENDING A GA; Doug Welch; Mar; 6
MOON AND PLANETS
JUPITER’S RED SPOT; Brian Stokow; Apr; 10
LUNAR OCCULTATIONS: VISUAL OBSERVATIONS; Brian Burke;
Dec; 12
MORE ON PLUTO AND THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AURORA;
Dave Fedosiewich; June; 17
MUTUAL PHENOMENA IN 1979; Doug Welch; Sept; 6
OBSERVING LUNAR OCCULTATIONS USING A PHOTOELECTRIC
PHOTOMETER Part 1; Brian Burke; June; 7
OBSERVING LUNAR OCCULTATIONS USING A PHOTOELECTRIC
PHOTOMETER Part 2; Brian Burke; July; 9
OBSERVING LUNAR OCCULTATIONS USING A PHOTOELECTRIC
PHOTOMETER Part 3; Brian Burke; Aug; 4
PLANETS IN NOVEMBER; Nov; 11
PLUTO 1; EARTH 1; Dave Fedosiewich; Feb; 5
THE PLANETS IN MARCH; Brian Burke; Mar; 8
THE PLANETS IN OCTOBER; Brian Burke; Oct; 5
THE PLANETS IN DECEMBER; Brian Burke; Dec; 17
SOLAR. RADIO. AND AURORA
A LONG TIME AGO IN A GALAXY FAR AWAY; Frank Roy; June; 17
MORE ON PLUTO AND THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AURORA;
Dave Fedosiewich; June; 17
RADIO ASTRONOMY - PLANS FOR 1979; Ken Tapping; Feb; 9
RADIO ASTRONOMY REPORT; Ken Tapping; July; 8
SOLAR X-RAY ASTRONOMY FROM GROUND LEVEL; Ken Tapping;
Oct; 6
THE FEBRUARY 26, 1979 SOLAR ECLIPSE ON SHORT WAVE;
Ken Tapping and Chip Wiest; Dec; 8
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Mar; 9
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Apr; 14
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; May; 3
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; June; 19
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Sept; 14
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Oct; 8
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Nov; 11
THE RADIO SUN; Frank Roy; Dec; 18
THE SOLAR PROJECT; Ken Tapping; July; 6
THE SUN FROM IRC; Frank Roy; Feb; 3
TO CATCH AN AURORA; Ken Tapping; Mar; 5LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
64 Orionis; Aug; 6
1979 Solar Eclipse; Apr; 6
Angular Separation of Stations; July; 11
A Star About to Disappear; June; 8
Astronotes; A Review; June; 22
Atlas; Aug; 7
Comet Meier; Dec; 16
Eclipse at Skip Points; Dec; 10
Effect of Bandwidth on Occultation; Aug; 8
Encoded Photometer; Nov; 7,8
Fred Werthman; Nov; 16
Fresnel Diffraction Pattern; June; 10
Lambda Aquarii; Aug; 5
Low Frequency Decoder; June; 15
Low Frequency Encoder; June; 14
Microcomputer Decode Input Port; Nov; 9,10
Min and Max Eclipse; Apr; 6
Perseid Maximum; Oct; 10,11
Photomultiplier Circuit; Dec; 14
Planetary Configuration; Dec; 18
Power Supply; June; 16
Problem of 1 station; July; 12
P/ Schwachmann-Wachmann 1; Apr; 12
Quadrantid Meteor Summary for 1979; Feb; 6
Rolf Makes Another Discovery; Nov; 17
Short Wave Reflection; Dec; 9
Solar Radio Activity; Feb; 4
Solar Radio Activity; Mar; 10
Solar Radio Activity; Apr; 15
Solar Radio Activity; May; 4
Solar Radio Activity; June; 20
Solar Radio Activity; Sept; 15,16
Solar Radio Activity; Oct; 9
Solar Radio Activity; Nov; 13
Solar Radio Activity; Dec; 19, 20, 21
Springhill Orionid Results; Dec; 6,7
Sun at 228 MHz; Nov; 12
The Indian River Observatory; June; 3
The IRDRI; Oct; 13, 14
Virgo A from IRORI; June; 20
WWV at 5 MHz during Eclipse; Dec; 9ASTRO NOTE