AstroNotes 1985 July Vol: 24 issue 07

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28

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A S T R O N O T E S
ISSN 0048-8682
The Newsletter Magazine of the Ottawa Centre of the RASC
Vol. 24, No. 7
$5.00 a year
July
1985
Editor.......Rolf Meier..... 4-A Arnold Dr....... 820-5784
Addresses....Art Fraser..... 92 Llllico Dr....... 737-4110
Circulation...Robin MoIson. ..,2029 Garfield Ave.. .225-3082
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - MAY 3
Daniel Dlab
Chairman Doug George opened the meeting at 8:14 pm
with 65 people in attendance, of whom 46 were members. He
announced that the next public star night will be held on
the night of May 24 or 25, at Andrew Haydon Park.
Centre president Brian Burke was up to thank all the
people involved in the Astronomy Day events at the Merivale
Mall and the Museum of Science and Technology. He reminded
the centre that Ken Tapping will be a judge at the
Canada-Wide Science Fair in mid-May.
Mall forms for the
1985 General Assembly in Edmonton were available at the
front.
The main speaker of the evening was Leo Enright of the
Kingston Centre.
He gave a talk on the short history of
the use of photographic films in astrophotography, giving
examples with slides of the moon, the sun, planets, aurora,
and various deep sky objects.
Variable star coordinator Sandy Ferguson encouraged
members to observe the six variables on the list to qualify
for the Variable Star Award given each year at the Annual
Di nner Meeting.
She presented Kyle Nunas who read his
school project about the moon.
Solar coordinator Linda Malar showed 5 slides of the
display at the Merivale Mall on Astronomy Day.
Instrumentation coordinator Max Stuart explained how
specially curved spider vanes supporting the diagonal
mirror of Newtonian telescopes could improve the image of
a bright star by eliminating the diffraction spikes around
it.
Doug George showed slides of Donna Kourtesssis, a
member of the Ottawa Centre, as she displays her project on
-1-communication between computers using lasers at the Science
Fair.
Next up was Roy Fox, who showed slides of aurora.
Brian and Irmi Underwood gave a slide show using 2
projectors and a tape player controlled by a computer,
Doug George closed the meeting at 10:35 pm.
* * *
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING - JUNE 7
Daniel Dalb
Chairman Doug George opened the meeting at 8:15 pm
with 43 people in attendance, of whom 30 were members.
There will be a star night held at IRO on June 14 or 15.
Frank Roy plans to organize a Lyrids meteor session of the
night of June 15/16.
Centre president Brian Burke was up to show slides of
the activities at the Museum of Science and Technology on
Astronomy
Day.
Also,
since
this
meeting
was
Instrumentation
Night,
he
displayed
his
Bushnell
binoculars,
his
4-inch
Schmidt-Cassegrain
Criterion
telescope, and slides of things he photographed
with it
from his apartment.
Planetary and comet coordinator Rolf Meier explained
what the Earth-Moon system would look like from the planet
Venus. From that distance, the moon would be half a degree
from the earth.
Also, Uranus and Neptune both come to
opposition this
month. Rolf then showed how
to take
pictures of objects he photographed using a home-made
wooden eyepiece projection system.
Chairman Doug George demonstrated the use of the
computer-controlled Celestron using Sky Sensor 2000.
He
modified it by
dimming the lights on the keyboard and
quieting the beeper.
The photometer made by various
members for the 16-inch at IRO was displayed.
Variable star coordinator Sandy Ferguson showed a
finder that was made with 50-mm binoculars, eyepiece, and
plumbing extensions.
Rob
Newton explained
how he uses
a piece of
transparent plastic with a circle engraved on it over his
star atlas to match his telescope’s field of view.
Instrumentation coordinator Max Stuart displayed his
wooden 6-inch and 13-inch telescopes, and explained how he
plans to construct a Poncet platform for the 13-inch
alt-azimuth mounted telescope to follow the stars.
Doug closed the meeting at 10:15 pm.
-2-Sandy Ferguson
VARIABLE STAR AWARD 1985
With summer upon us and the prospect of warm (and
hopefully clear and starry) nights ahead for a while, why
not dust off the binoculars and consider becoming a
participant in the Observer’s Group variable star program?
For beginners, it's a way to get to know the sky; for those
with more experience, it's a chance to discover just how
stars and their behaviour differ; and for the really
advanced, it can lead to a lifetime of contributing to an
extremely valuable branch of astronomy, one in which
professional astronomers cannot always participate.
Being a member of the variable star observers crowd in
the Ottawa Centre has other bonuses too. For instance, you
would be eligible to win the Variable Star Award, presented
each fall at the Annual Dinner Meeting, and have the
opportunity to take home the engraved plaque for a year.
Now that's worth thinking about isn’t it? Your family and
friends would truly be in awe of your achievements!
So, now that I ’ve got your attention, you will no
doubt want to know how to get involved.
Well, the first
thing you should do is get the variable star handbook from
me; I will have copies at the Observer’s Group meetings,
and if you cannot attend, I will be delighted to deliver or
mail a copy to you.
Secondly, you will have to get into
the backyard and start locating the variables on the
program.
You're having trouble tracking them down, you say? No
problem; give me a call and we'll take the time to walk
through them one by one, until you are comfortable finding
them and recording estimates.
Thirdly, you will have to maintain your observing
records end submit them to me, either on a regular basis
over the summer or in total before the Dinner Meeting in
November.
Fourthly, you will have to walk from the dinner table
to the podium to receive the Variable Star Award when it is
presented to you after a summer of hard-won brightness
estimates.
Right,
Now you want to know just what stars are on
the award program this year, and a little bit about each
one.
1)
Delta Cephei
A bright, easy-to-find variable in the
constellation Cepheus.
It is the prototype for the
variables known as Cepheids and has a cycle of 5.37 days
-3-and magnitude difference from 3.6 to 4.4.
Can be observed
naked-eye, but binoculars make magnitude estimates easier.
2)
Beta Lyrae
A bright eclipsing binary in the
constellation Lyra. Another naked-eye star, but binoculars
make estimates easier.
It has a period of 12.93599 days
(approximately?) and ranges from magnitude 3.4 to 4.3.
3)
R Scuti
A semi-regular variable
in the
constellation of Scutum.
Easy to find as it is near the
star cluster M 11. R Scuti is known as an RV Tauri type of
variable (light curves with alternate deep and shallow
minima), and has an average cycle of about 140 days.
4)
Chi Cygni
The long-period one of the bunch. Chi is
expected to reach maximum brightess in July, so it's an
easy target from the city.
Its magnitude can be anywhere
from 5th to 13th magnitude, but is an easy binocular object
for the brighter part of its cycle.
5)
RX Cassiopeiae
Another eclipsing binary in
Cassiopeia.
This one is fun because you can watch its
entire eclipse over the course of a few hours.
For this
reason estimates are made every few minutes to get an
accurate light curve for the variable.
Magnitude changes
from 6.2 to 7.8.
6)
X Herculis
Another semi-regular and a bit of a
challenge object, compared to the others.
(Well, they
can’t all be easy!)
Magnitude ranges from roughly 6.3 to
7.4 with a period of about 100 days.
So there you are.
Now that you have been formally
introduced to the 6 of them, I hope your interest is piqued
in this fascinating branch of astronomy. Please contact me
for any charts or information you need to get started, and
I look forward to receiving your observations throughout
the summer. I can be reached at 829-7514 at home or at any
Observer’s Group meeting.
* * *
Articles for the August issue of Astronotes are due by
July 22.
* * *
-4-EVENTS FOR JULY
Doug George
Since w e ’ve been having cloud problems with most of
our events recently, it was decided to hold two this
month. The first is a star night for members and visitors
at the Indian River Observatory. I will be coordinating
rides for those people who do not have transportation
available.
The second event will be a public star night.
The moon and Saturn should be popular sights.
The events are as follows:
July 12 or July 13 - IRO star night
July 26 or 27- PUBLIC star night at Vincent Massey Park
If you need a ride, or have any other questions, don’t
hesitate to call me at 725-0668,
Don’t be shy, I'll be
quite happy to help you!
* * *
SUMMER METEOR SHOWERS
Frank Roy
Meteor season is upon us again and this summer should
be a good one,
I will start off with a meteor session at
Quiet Site for the Omicron Draconids on Saturday night,
July 13/14.
Moonrise is at 02:30, so it should give us
about 4 hours of observing.
For those of you who are not
familiar with QS, it is our second observing station and is
located near Shirley's Bay on the Ottawa River,
Only 6
people have a key to this site.
They are David Lauzon,
Sandy Ferguson, Rolf Meier, Robert Dick, and me.
The Perseids are very favourable this year, reaching
maximum just 4 days before new moon.
They are known for
swift and bright meteors and very high hourly rates.
The
Perseids have a flat maximum, so many meteors may be seen a
week before or after the maximum, which occurs this year on
August 11/12, a Sunday night.
I plan to have meteor
sessions for both Friday and Saturday night at Quiet Site,
and if there is enough enthusiasm, I will have a session on
Sunday night.
The Kappa Cygnids reach their maximum on August 18,
with a ZHR of 6, A session is planned for IRO on Saturday
night, August 17/18.
For more detailed information on these and other
showers, consult the Observer's Handbook 1985.
-5-Frank Roy
JUNE LYRIDS OBSERVED
The June Lyrids were observed at IRO by Doug George,
Daniel Dlab, and myself on the night of June 15/16.
The
sky was about 80% cloudy for the entire observing session
of about l hour, and less than a dozen Lyrids were observed
by the 3 of us. Linda Meier reports that she also observed
the Lyrids on June 15/16, but that she saw very few
meteors.
* *
A GRAZE!
*
Brian Burke
The latest grazing occultation predictions reveal that
a graze will pass through the centre of Ottawa. The data
for this graze is as follows:
date: Tuesday, July 23
time: 19:47 EDT
star: SAO 139189
magnitude: 4.4
limb: north, dark
moon: 39% sunlit
type: favourable
location: Leitrim Road
The limit line for this graze runs north-south through
Ottawa, cutting across the Western Parkway, the Queensway,
Carling Avenue, Heron Road, and Walkely Road.
The best
site appears to be Leitrim Road, just south of Uplands
Airport.
Note that this is a daytime graze, as the sun
will still be about 7° above the horizon.
We have never
attempted such a graze before.
However,
like all jobs,
this task has
a few
occupational hazards.
Anyone at a station between the
railroad tracks and High Road, hit the dirt when you hear
someone yelling FORE! because you will be next to a golf
course. If you happen to be west of High Road then keep a
low profile, because you will be in the corridor for
landing aircraft.
Also, setting up telescopes in daylight
may attract attention, especially from people in blue cars.
We will meet at Billings Bridge Shopping Centre
outside the Mr. Donut at 18:30.
If interested in
participating in this expedition or if you can lend
equipment, please call me at 521-8856 after July 15.
-6-RADIO TELESCOPE BACK ON THE AIR
Frank Roy
The Indian River Observatory Radio Interferometer
(IRORI) picked up a textbook fringe from Cygnus A on June
18, 1985.
The radio telescope has been undergoing some
changes since the summer of 83.
We changed our operating
frequency last year to 244 MHz with little success. Now we
are back on 238.5 MHz and are picking up some excellent
fringes from Cygnus A, as demonstrated by the fringe on the
next page.
The IRORI is a phase-switched interferometer
with two 15-m by 5-m parabolic cylinders separated by 185
metres in the east-west direction.
It is a transit
instrument.
The interferometer was dedicated in 1978 by Art
Covington and since has undergone may changes.
The
receiver was completely rebuilt including the front end
preamps.
So far we successfully picked up 6 or 7 radio
sources, including the sun, Cass A, Cyg A, Tau A, Vir A,
Her A, and Cent A.
The last one is somewhat uncertain
because we have only 1 noisy fringe from this source.
As the telescope undergoes further improvements, we
expect to achieve enough sensitivity to detect several
quasars, and possibly a pulsar.
Since the interferometer
is in a state of flux, it is not ready for use.
But
hopefully by late this fall our improvements should be
finished and the system will be ready for use by
interested observers.
Projects slated for IRORI this year are:
mapping the
sky to -45° dec with the possibility of picking up a dozen
or so radio sources; mapping the milky way; and monitoring
the daily solar activity. The use of a programmable timer
permits the user to activate the chart recorder only when
the source is in the beam.
Anyone interested in using the interferometer should
contact me at the Observer's Group meetings.
*
*
MESSIER RACE
*
Doug George
Many of you will recall the highly-successful Messier
Marathon held a few months ago.
While the marathon is an
excellent way for observers to gain experience in finding
different objects, it is only possible over a short period
of time. It is also difficult for beginners to participate
in the marathon, as it takes an entire night.
For this
-7-CYGNUS A. Recorded with IRORI @238.5MHz with
a time constant of 10 seconds, and chart speed
of 6 in ch es per hour. The antennae are 15x5m
cylinders spaced by 185m in the east-west.reason I am introducing a slower-paced version of the
Messier Marathon, the Messier Race. Here, the objective is
to observe all of the Messier objects over a period of
months.
For the beginner with modest equipment, many of the
Messier objects can be found with binoculars, or even with
the unaided eye. It is possible to find all the objects in
a 6-inch telescope.
It is very important to get away from
the city lights while observing, but you could probably
find quite a few objects from your backyard.
The best
indication is the magnitude of the object,
M 13, for
example, is at about magnitude 6, and is visible to the
naked eye under good conditions.
It can be found with
binoculars under fairly poor conditions.
Dimmer objects,
such as the 1lth-magnitude galaxy M 89, require dark sky
conditions and a modest-sized telescope.
For this purpose, I have created a new version of my
Messior list, which lists all the objects by hours of right
ascension.
Therefore, all the objects in one area of the
sky are grouped together.
The table includes the same
information as the original one.
The first column gives
the Messier number of the object.
Next, the position in
right ascension and declination is shown.
The position
follows the format of Burnham's Celestial Handbook (a set
of books which I highly recommend.
In this format,
13249sl205 translates to RA 13h 24.9m, dec -12° 05' (epoch
1950.0).
The "s" indicates that the object is south in
declination, resulting in the negative declination.
The
next
column of the table give the page number in
Burnham's.
Next, map numbers are listed for Wil Tirion's
Sky Atlas 2000.0, Skalnate Pleso Atlas, and Norton's Star
Atlas. Then, the type of object, the constellation where
the object is found, and its magnitude are listed. A brief
description is also included for selected objects.
This table makes it quite easy to locate all of the
objects.
If you have a telescope with setting circles,
you can find the position from the table.
I strongly
recommend that you use a technique called "star hopping",
especially if you are a beginner interested in learning the
constellations, the use of a telescope, and general
observing techniques.
The first step is to look up the
desired object on a star atlas.
A good star altlas, such
as the Sky Atlas 2000.0, is essential for star hopping, as
well as observing in general.
It is often difficult for
the beginner to recognize the constellations on such an
atlas, because the outlines of the figures they represent
-9-are not shown. To help you recognize the constellations on
the map and in the sky, you can look at simpler charts,
such as the ones in the hack of the Observer's Handbook.
The map number columns in the table will help you find
the desired object in the star atlas.
If you have trouble
finding the object quickly on the map, then a glance at the
RA and Dec will lead you directly to the object. Comparing
the map and the sky, you can determine the approximate
position of the object on the sky. Now, you can locate the
object
in the telescope by star-hopping.
In this
technique, you start at a bright star near the object that
you can locate easily, and move to fainter stars until you
find the correct field,
A column is provided in the table
to check off each object that you find, to keep a record of
your progress.
If you are just starting, and want to find some easier
objects, I would recommend M 44 and M 45 (naked eye or
binoculars);
M 13, M 31, and M 42 (binoculars
or
telescope); and M 2, M 8, M 17, M 27, M 57, M 81, and M 82
(telescope).
Of course, there are many other bright
objects
within the
range
of
small
instruments
or
binoculars. You can probably find most, if not all of the
star clusters using a small instrument.
As a guide to planning your observations, the RA hour
directly overhead at about 8:30 pm for all months is shown
below. You should be able to see objects within at least 4
hours on either side of this hour angle. Since the objects
are listed by RA hour in the table, this should help you
determine which objects are above the horizon at any time.
January: 4
February: 6
March: 8
April: 10
May: 12
June:
14
July: 16
August:
18
September: 20
October: 22
November: 0
December:
2
If you have any questions, or would like some help in
actual observing, feel free to call me any evening:
Doug George
725-0668
-10-MESSIER OBJECTS
LISTED BY HOURS OF RIGHT ASCENSION
Description
Norton Typ Con Mag 2
2 3,4
3,4 Sp
E1 And
And 4
9 1
4
10
1 2
2
6
2 1,2
3,4
3,4
3,4 C1
Sp
Sp
Pl Cas
Tri
Psc
Per 7
6
10
11 1432
644 4
10 2
6 5,6
5,6 Cl
Sp Per
Cet 6
10 03439s2358 1863 4 2 5,6 Cl Tau 79
38
1
36
42
43
78
37 05222s2434
05253n3548
05315n2159
05320n3407
05329s0525
05331s0518
05442n0002
05490n3233 1099
295
1843
290
1317
1324
1339
293 19
5
5
5
11
11
11
5 12
2
7
2
7
7
7
2 5,6
5,6
5,6
5,6
5,6
5,6
5,6
5,6 Gb
Cl
Di
Cl
Dl
Di
Di
Cl Lep
Aur
Tau
Aur
Ori
Ori
Ori
Aur 8
7
9
6 35
41 06057n2420
06449s2042 934
442 5
19 3
7 7,8
7,8 Cl
Cl Gem
CMa 6
6 50
47
46
93 07005s0816
07343sl422
07396nl442
07424s2345 1194
1512
1508
1514 12
12
12
19 7
7
7
13 7,8
7,8
7,8
7,8 Cl
Cl
Cl
Cl Mon
Pup
Pup
Pup 6
5
7
6 48
44
67 0811280538
08375nl952
08483nl200 1023
345
349 12
6
12 8
8
8 7,8
7,8
7,8 Cl
Cl
Cl Hya
Cnc
Cnc 6
4
7 BEEHIVE
81
82 09515n6918
09519n6956 1983
1987 2
2 1
1 1,2
1,2 Sp
Ir UMa
UMa 7
9 Fine Spiral
Irregular near 81
95
96
105 10413nll58
10442nl205
10452nl251 1078
1078 13
13
13 8
8
8 9,10
9,10
9,10 Sp
Sp
El Leo
Leo
Leo 10
10
10 108
97
65
66
109 11087n5557
11120n5518
11163nl323
11176nl317
11550n5339 2
2
13
13
2 3
3
8
8
3 1,2
9,10
9,10
9,10
1,2 Sp
Pl
Sp
Sp
Sp UMa
UMa
Leo
Leo
UMa 10
11
10
9
10
T ir
M RA and DEC Burn 31
32 00400n4100
00400n4036 129
149 4
4
103
33
74
76 01299n6027
01311n3024
01340nl532
01388n5119 523
1897
1479
1435 34
77 02388n4234
02401s0014 45
1966
1073
1073
SP
ANDROMEDA GALAXY
companion to above
Pinwheel Galaxy
Cork Nebula
PLEIADES
CRAB NEB
ORION NEBULA
n.e. orion
8
6
pair with 96
pair with 95
OWL NEBULA
pair with 66
pair with 65INDEX TO ASTRONOTES VOLUME 23 (1984)
Issues:
Pages:
10
104
COMETS, ASTEROIDS, NOVAE
P/CROMMELIN-A DUD; DAVE FEDOSIEWICH; MARCH; 14
LEARN MORE ABOUT COMETS; DAVE FEDOSIEWICH; MARCH; 14
OCCULATION OF SAO 158913 BY SATURN-MARCH 23; ROLF MEIER; MARCH; 17
LEARN MORE ABOUT COMETS HERE; DAVE FEDOSIEWICH; MAY; 7
NEW COMET MEIER-1984o; OCTOBER; 6
NEW COMET LEVY-REDENKO 1984t; ROLF MEIER; DECEMBER; 4
EDITORIALS
ON ASTRONOTES; SEPTEMBER; 1
ERRATA
CORRECTION; DAVID LAUZON; MAY; 3
ILLUSTRATIONS AND PHOTOS
LIGHT CURVE , DELTA CEPHEI; MARCH; 8
FINDER CHART , T MONOCEROTIS , RX LEPORIS; MARCH; 10
SOLAR EXPLORING; APRIL; 4
MAP OF MAY 1984 ANNULAR ECLIPSE; MAY; 4
ECLIPSE TYPES; MAY; 6
FINDER CHART, g HERCULIS AND X HERCULIS; MAY; 12
MAY GRAZE; JUNE; 5
FINDER CHART, CHI CYGNI; JUNE; 7
FINDER CHART, BETA LYRAE; JUNE; 8
MARS DRAWINGS; JUNE; 10
SIDEREAL CLOCK SCHEMATIC; SEPTEMBER; 8-9-10
FINDER CHART, R SCUTI; SEPTEMBER; 12
FINDER CHART, RZ CAS; SEPTEMBER; 13
IRO MAP; NOVEMBER; 7
DOMINION OBSERVATORY OTTAWA; NOVEMBER; 8
PHOTO M100; DECEMBER; 5
PHOTO M 31; DECEMBER; 6
INSTRUMENTATION
GENARATING SIDEREAL TIME; FRANK ROY; SEPTEMBER; 7
MEETINGS, CONVENTIONS, STAR NIGHTS
DINNER MEETING-NOVEMBER 25; JANUARY; 1
COUNCIL MEETING-JANUARY 25; ROB McCALLUM; MARCH; 2
COORDINATORS MEETING-FEBRUARY 3; GARY SUSICK; MARCH; 2
TELESCOPE WORKSHOP; MALCOLM LAMBOURNE; MARCH; 5
DR. VARSHNI ON QUASARS; APRIL; 1
ASTRONOMY DAY AT ST-LAURENT SHOPPING CENTRE; LINDA WARREN; JUNE; 2
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMY DAY; GARY SUSICK; JUNE; 3
- 11a -THE 50TH ANNUAL STELLAFANE MEETING; LINDA MEIER; SEPTEMBER; 4
THE 1984 GENERAL ASSEMBLY CONVENTION; LOUIS KRUSHNISKY; SEPTEMBER; 5
DEEP SKY WEEKEND THIS MONTH; SEPTEMBER; 14
CENTRE MEETING-SEPTEMBER 18; MALCOLM LAMBOURNE; OCTOBER; 2
COUNCIL MEETING-SEPTEMBER 12; MALCOLM LAMBOURNE; OCTOBER; 4
ANNUAL DINNER MEETING; OCTOBER; 5
11TH ANNUAL DEEP SKY WEEKEND; OCTOBER ; 5
AAVSO FALL MEETING; OCTOBER; 6
NEW MEMBERS NIGHT; MALCOLM LAMBOURNE; NOVEMBER; 6
DINNER MEETING; NOVEMBER; 9
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-DECEMBER 2 1983; DAVID LAUZON; JANUARY; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-JANUARY 6 1984; DAVID LAUZON; FEBUARY; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-FEBUARY 3 1984; DAVID FEDOSIEWICH; MARCH; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-APRIL 6 1984; DAVID LAUZON; MAY; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-MAY 4 1984; DAVID LAUZON; JUNE; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-AUGUST 3 1984; DAVID LAUZON; SEPTEMBER; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-JUNE 1 1984; DAVID LAUZON; SEPTEMBER; 2
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-SEPTEMBER 7 1984; DAVID LAUZON; OCTOBER; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-OCTOBER 5 1984; DAVID LAUZON; NOVEMBER; 1
OBSERVER'S GROUP MEETING-NOVEMBER 2 1984; LOUIS KRUSHNISKY; DECEMBER; 1
METEORS AND AURORA
QUIET SITE; JANUARY; 6
THE GIMINIDS OF 1983 AND BEYOND; DAVID LAUZON; FEBUARY; 3
THE 1984 QUADRANTIDS; LINDA WARREN; MARCH; 12
SPRING METEORS-THE APRIL LYRIDS; DAVID LAUZON; APRIL; 9
METEOR SIGHTED DURING SEPTEMBER MEETING; THOMAS WRAY; NOVEMBER; 5
MISCELLANEOUS
ASTRONOMICAL TRIVIA; JANUARY; 4
THE MINI MAGELLANIC CLOUD; FEBRUARY; 2
IRAS NO LONGER ALIVE; FEBRUARY; 4
ATRONOMICAL TRIVIA; FEBRUARY; 9
ASSORTED BUSINESS; ROB McCALLUM; MARCH; 5
ASTRONOMICAL TRIVIA; MARCH; 18
HOW OLD IS THIS ROCK CALLED EARTH; DAVID LAUZON; APRIL; 5
BOK AWARDS IN ASTRONOMY FOR H.S. STUDENTS; PAUL FELDMAN; APRIL; 7
ASTRONOMICAL TRIVIA; APRIL; 10
ASTRONOMICAL TRIVIA; MAY; 3
FOR SALE; NOVEMBER; 9
AWARDS; NOVEMBER; 9
ASTROWORD; NOVEMBER; 10
PLANETS, LUNAR
A MARCH GRAZE; BRIAN BURKE; MARCH; 6
TWO MORE GRAZES; BRIAN BURKE; APRIL; 8
MARS COMES TO OPPOSITION; ROLF MEIER; MAY; 13
THE MAY GRAZE; BRIAN BURKE; JUNE; 4
OBSERVATIONS OF MARS; JUNE; 10
RADIO ASTRONOMY
- 11b-RADIO ASTRONOMY UPDATE; FRANK ROY; NOVEMBER; 6
REPORTS, LETTERS, COMMENTS
CHAIRMAN'S PREVIEW OF 1984; GARY SUSICK; JANUARY; 1
THE 1984 OBSERVER'S GROUP COORDINATORS; GARY SUSICK; JANUARY; 3
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR; FEBRUARY; 4
CHAIRMAN'S REVIEW-1983; ROLF MEIER; FEBRUARY; 9
NOTICE (DEAR OBSERVER); MAY; 14
LETTERS; RUTH HICKS; NOVEMBER; 3
A VISIT TO THE MONTREAL CENTRE OF THE RASC; SANDY FERGUSON; NOVEMBER; 3
PHOTOGRAPHS IN ASTRONOTES; DECEMBER; 4
ARTICLES IN ASTRONOTES; 4
SOLAR
SOLAR ACTIVITY; LINDA WARREN; JANUARY; 3
SOLAR EXPLORING; LINDA WARREN; APRIL; 2
ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN; LINDA WARREN; MAY; 4
TABLES AND LISTS
LIST OF KEYHOLDERS 1984; SEPTEMBER; 14
VARIABLE STARS
VARIABLE STARS OF THE MONTH; SANDY THUESEN; FEBRUARY; 5
EPSILON AURIGAE; SANDY THUESEN; FEBRUARY; 7
TYPES OF VARIABLE STARS; SANDY THUESEN; MARCH; 6
VARIABLE STAR OF THE MONTH-RT AURIGAE AND T MONOCEROTIS; SANDY THUESEN; MARCH; 9
SEMI-REGULAR VARIABLES; SANDY THUESEN; MAY; 10
VARIABLE STARS OF THE MONTH-(30) HERCULIS AND X HERCULIS; SANDY THUESEN; MAY; 11
VARIABLE STARS OF THE MONTH; SANDY THUESEN; JUNE; 6
R CORONAE BOREALIS; SANDY THUESEN; JUNE; 8
VARIABLE STAR AWARD-1984; SANDY THUESEN; JUNE; 9
VARIABLE STARS OF THE MONTH-R SCT , RZ CAS; SANDY THUESEN; SEPTEMBER; 11
VARIABLE STAR WRAP-UP; SANDY FERGUSON; DECEMBER; 3
- 11c-OBSERVING NOTES
MEETING NOTES
- 11d -M RA and DEC Burn Tir SP Norton Typ Con Mag 106
98
99
60
61
100
84 104
59
94
64 12165n4735
12113nl511
12163nl442
12194n0405
12194n0445
12204nl606
12226nl310
12237nl313
12228nl828
12273n0816
12283nl240
12295nl442
12331nl250
12343nl326
12351nl205
12368s2629
12373sll21
12395nll55
12486n4123
12543n2147 681
685
2088
2089
685
2091
2091
678
2086
2092
680
2096
2097
2086
1024
2097
2088
377
677 7
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
21
14
14
7
7 3
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
14
9
9
4
9 9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10 Sp
Sp
Sp
El
Sp
Sp
El
El
El
El
El
Sp
El
Sp
Sp
Gb
Sp
El
Sp
Sp CVn
Com
Com
Vir
Vir
Com
Vir
Vir
Com
Vir
Vir
Com
Vir
Vir
Vir
Hya
Vir
Vir
CVn
Com 9
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
9
10
10
11
10
10
9
8
10
9
8 53
63
51
83
3 13105nl826
13135n4217
13278n4727
13343s2937
13399n2838 673
373
369
1024
363 7
7
7
21
7 9
4
4
14
4 9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10
9,10 Gb
Sp
Sp
Sp
Gb Com
CVn
CVa
Hya
Cvn 8
9
9
8
7 WHIRLPOOL GALAXY
101 14014n5435 2000 2 4 11,12 Sp UMa 8 large spiral
5 15160n0216 1776 15 9 11,12 Gb Ser 6 80
4
107
13 1716
1699 10
62
19 16141s2252
16206s2624
16297sl257
16399n3633
16446s0152
16545s0402
16581s3003
16595s2611 978
1262
1261
1715
1263 22
22
15
8
15
15
22
22 14
14
10
4
10
10
14
14 11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12 Gb
Gb
Gb
Gb
Gb
Gb
Gb
Gb Sco
Sco
Oph
Her
Oph
Oph
Oph
Oph 8
6
9
6
7
7
7
8 92
9
14 17156n4312
17162sl828
17350s0313 993
1258
1262 8
22
15 4
10
10 11,12
11,12
11,12 Gb
Gb
Gb Her
Oph
Oph 7
8
9 6 17368s3211
17507s3448
17540sl901
17589s2302 1705
1709
1599
1591 22
22
22
22 14
14
10
10 11,12
11,12
11,12
11,12 Cl
Cl
Cl
Di Sco
Sco
Sgr
Sgr 6
5
7
86
85
49
87
88
89
90
58
68
12
7
23
20
-12-
Description
radio source
SOMBRERO GALAXY
BLACKEYE GALAXY
Dense Globular
HERCULES cluster
bright globular
TRIFIDM RA and DEC Burn T ir SP Norton
21
8
24
16
17
18
28
69
25 70
26
11
57
54 18018s2230
18016s2420
18155sl827
18160sl348
18180sl612
18170sl709
18215s2454
18281s3223
18288sl917
18333s2358
18400s3221
18425s0927
18484s0620
18517n3258
18520s3032 1594
1574
1603
1783
1584
1587
1609
1613
1604
1596
1614
1756
1750
1163
1610 22
22
22
16
16
16
22
22
22
22
22
16
16
7
22 10
10
10
10
10
10
15
15
10
10
15
10
10
5
15 56
55
71
27 19146n3005
19369s3103
19514nl839
19544n2235 1161
1612
1544
2117 8
22
8
8 75
29
72 20032s2204
20222n3821
20508sl244 1615
799
188 15
39 30 21276nll57
21304n4813
21309s0104
21375s2325 52 23220n6120
22
2
Typ Con Mag
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14 Cl
Di
MW
Cl
Di
Cl
Gb
Gb
Cl
Gb
Gb
Cl
Cl
Pl
Gb Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Ser
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sct
Sct
Lyr
Sgr 7
6
5
7
7
8
8
6
6
8
9
6
9
8
5
15
10
5 13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14 Gb
Gb
Gb
Pl Lyr
Sgr
Sgr
Vul 9
6
8
8
22
9
16 10
5
11 13,14
13,14
13,14 Gb
Cl
Gb Sgr
Cyg
Aqr 9
7
9
1383
799
186
456 17
9
17
23 11
5
11
15 13,14
13,14
13,14
13,14 Gb
Cl
Gb
Gb Peg
Cyg
Aqr
Cap 7
5
7
8
520 3 5 1,2 Cl Cas 8
........ K E Y ........
Cl
Di
El
Gb
Ir
MW
Pl
Sp
Open Star Cluster
Diffuse Nebula
Elliptical Galaxy
Globular Cluster
Irregular Galaxy
Star Cloud
Planetary Nebula
Spiral Galaxy
-13-
Description
LAGOON
Identity uncertain
Star Queen
OMEGA or SWAN
large globular
RING NEBULA
DUMBBELL
bright globularSOME (MORE) HIGH PROPER MOTION STARS
Frank Roy
In the June issue of Astronotes I presented 4 stars
which are part of the IRO Proper Motion Survey,
This
survey is to encourage members in the OG to participate in
a scientific project using the 40-cm telescope at IRO. The
goal of the project is to photograph certain high proper
motion stars at the prime focus of the telescope. I have
chosen the 100 fastest moving
stars north of declination
-40° as listed in the Luyten catalog of high proper motion
stars (LHS Catalog 1979).
The photographs will be 10-minute exposures on a high
speed film such as Fujichrome 400D , Tri-X, Kodak 2415, or
Agfa 200RS. This will give a limiting magnitude for stars
of about 17. The 40-cm is an f/5 with a focal length of
2000 mm, giving it an image scale at the prime focus of
105" per mm.
A standard 35-mm slide or negative measures
24 x 36 mm, resulting in a field of 42' x 63'.
The equipment for doing astrophotography is available
at IRO.
All that is required from you is the "T" adapter
for your particular 35-mm camera.
If anyone is interested
in participating in this project I would like to hear from
them.
The magnitudes are photographic.
Most of the stars
are quite red so the visual magnitude is about 1 or 2 mags
brighter.
The PA (position angle) of the motion is the
usual notation, from the north point through the east, from
0 to 360 degrees.
Mu is the annual proper motion in
seconds of arc per year.
Ross 619
position:
RA 8h 09m 12s, Dec +8° 59.6' (1950.0)
8h 11m 58s
+8° 46.3' (2000.0)
Mr: 12.7
Mpg: 14.3
colour: M
mu: 5.211" per year
theta:
167.1 degrees
constellation: Cancer
other designations:
LHS 35, G050-022, LFT 569, Ci20-462,
GL 299, LTT 18039
61 Cygni A, B
A very famous double star.
-14-
In 1792, Piazzi detectedan annual proper motion of 5.22" per year.
61 Cygni A has
a visual magnitude of 5.3 and a calculated distance of 11.1
light years.
position:
RA 21h 04m 39s, Dec +38° 30.2' (1950.0)
21h 06m 54s
+38° 45.0' (2000.0)
Mr: 4.9
Mpg: 6.2
colour: K6
mu: 5.204" per year
theta: 52.2 degrees
constellation: Cygnus
distance:
11.1 light years
other designations:
LHS 62,
GL 819, SAO 70919, ADS 14636
BD+38
4343A,
HD
201091,
Lalande 21185
Lalande 21185 is the 4th nearest star known.
It has
an apparent visual magnitude of 7.6 and is a red dwarf.
position:
RA llh 00m 37s, Dec +36° 18.3' (1950.0)
llh 03m 20s
+35° 58.2' (2000.0)
M r : 7.3
Mpg: 9.0
colour: M2
mu: 4.778" per year
theta: 186.8 degrees
constellation: Ursa Major
distance: 8.15 light years
other designations: LHS 37, BD+36 2147, LFT 756, GC 15183,
Ci20-604, GL 411, G119-052, HD 95735, SAO 62377
Wolf 359
Famous star discovered by professor Max Wolf, and the
3rd nearest star known.
It has an apparent visual
magnitude of 13.66.
position:
RA 10h 54m 06s, Dec +07° 19.1' (1950.0)
10h 56m 29s
+07° 00.7' (2000.0)
Mr: 13.5
Mpg:
15.6
colour: M6e
theta: 234.6 degrees
constellation: Leo
-15-other designations: LFT 750, G045-020, Ci20-600, GL 406
references
Burnham's Celestial Handbook, Robert Burnham Jr; 1978; 61
Cygni:
768-771; Lalande 21185:
1980-1982; Wolf 359:
1071-1073
LHS Atlas, Willem J . Luyten and Henry Albers; 1979
LHS Catalog (second edition), Willem J Luyten; 1979
Lowell
Proper Motion Survey, The G Numbered Stars,
H.L. Giclas, R . Burnham Jr., and N.G. Thomas; 1971
Gliese Catalog of Nearby Stars (Edition 1969), W. Gliese;
1969
Sky Catalog 2000.0, Volume 1, Alan Hirshfeld and Roger W.
Sinnot
Special thanks to Paul Feldman of HIA for providing me
the catalogs of high proper motion stars and nearby stars,
and to Roy Fox for the enlargements.
FIELD OF LALANDE 21185. Grid squares are 1 on a side with
north at the top; stars to about 11th magnitude are shown.
- 16-ROSS 619. Identification field from a red
plate of the National Geographic Palomar
Sky Survey (48" Schmidt). The chart is 11
minutes on a side, with north up, and
east to the left with the LHS number in
the lower left corner.
-I7 -WOLF 359. Identification field for the famous red dwarf,
from a Lowell Observatory 13-inch telescope plate. Circle
diameter = 1°, north at the top, limiting magnitude 15.61 CYGNI. The noted binary is shown here in 1916 and 1948;
illustrating the proper motion over an interval of 32 years.
19IRO PROPER MOTION SURVEY
STAR
LHS
CON
MU
"
2000.0
DEC
'
PA
deg
Ophi 10.310 355.8
UMaj 7.042 145.5
PscA 6.907 78.9
Scul 6.108 112.5
Cygn 5.211 167.1 MAG RA
h m s
11.2 175749
7.3 115259
8.9 230552
10.2 000524
14.3 081158 +0441.8
+3743.1
-3551.2
-3721.4
+0846.3
Barnard°s star
Groombridge 1830
Lacaille 9352
Cordoba 32416
Ross 619 57
44
70
1
35 61 Cygni A
B
Lalande 21185
Wolf 359
Lalande 21258 A
B
( WX UMaj ) 62
63
37
36
38 Cygn
Cygn
UMaj
Leo
UMaj
UMaj 5.204
5.204
4.778
4.696
4.531
4.531 52.2
52.2
186.8
234.6
281.9
281.9 6.2
7.2
9.0
15.6
10.2
16.0 210654
210655
110320
105629
110528
110530 +3845.0
+3844.5
+3558.2
+0700.7
+4331.6
+4331.3
Omicron 2 Eri A
B
C
Wolf 489
Mu Cassiopeiae 23
24
25
46
8 Erid
Erid
Erid
Virg
Cass 4.079
4.079
4.079
3.870
3.762 213.3
213.3
213.3
253.6
114.9 5.3
9.7
12.3
15.6
6.1 041516
041521
041521
133632
010816 -0739.2
-0739.5
-0739.5
+0340.8
+5455.2
BD+05:1668
Wash. 5583
Wash. 5584
LP9-231
Cordoba 29191 33
52
53
56
66 CMin
Libr
Libr
Drac
Micr 3.761
3.681
3.681
3.587
3.453 171.2
195.9
195.9
337.3
250.5 11.4
10.7
9.9
15.3
7.9 072724
151013
151013
174939
211715 +0513.5
-1627.7
-1622.7
+8246.4
-3852.1
L726-8 A
L726-8 B
L279-6
Ross 451
Ross 578 9
10
68
42
20 Ceti
Ceti
Aqua
Drac
Erid 3.368
3.368
3.254
3.209
3.033 80.4
80.4
46.6
175.2
152.1 14.1
14.6
14.4
12.7
13.3 013902
013902
223834
114016
033828 -1757.0
-1757.0
-1517.1
+6715.4
-1132.1
Van Maanen°s Star 7
BD+66: 717
41
BD+43s 44A
3
BD+43: 44B
4
BD+ 2: 348
14 Pisc
UMaj
Andr
Andr
Cetu 2.980
2.950
2.899
2.899
2.598 155.7
273.0
82.2
82.2
223.1 12.8
10.8
9.6
12.6
11.3 004910
112005
001823
001826
021221 +0523.4
+6550.7
+4401.4
+4401.7
+0334.4
Orio
Aqua
Aqua
Aqua
Corv 2.571
2.570
2.557
2.557
2.532 128.4
106.0
150.1
150.1
154.7 12.8
16.8
13.2
13.5
12.5 054209
225352
234314
234317
122453 +1242.0
-0646.9
-2409.9
-2411.3
-1814.5
Ross 47
LP 701- 29
L720-89
L720-88
Ross 695
31
69
72
73
45The Horsehead Nebula, as photographed with the 16"
telescope at IPO. I used Tri-X film with a 30 min.
exposure. Thanks to Roy Fox for making the half­
tone.
Rolf Meier
- 21 -STELLAFANE
Stellafane is the name of the annual telescope maker's
convention which is held each year on Breezy Hill, near the
town of Springfield, Vermont.
Many members of the Ottawa
Centre go to Stellafane every year.
It is about a 6-hour
drive from Ottawa. The convention is being held on August
17 this year, although there are activities on Friday,
August 16 as well.
This year it is the "real" 50th
Stellafane convention. Many people camp there, although if
you don't have your camping permit by now it is probably
too late. There are, however, many other campsites in the
area, and also motels.
If you have built a good telescope
recently, you should enter it. Many Ottawa Centre members
have won prizes for their telescopes. This year, Halley's
Comet will be the subject of a number of "tent talks", also
held on Saturday.
Other features of Stellafane include
twilight talks, a swap table, and evening observing and
optical judging.
(The mechanical judging is done during
the daytime.)
If you go to Stellafane for the first time
this year, be prepared for the small size of the convention
site; it is even smaller than it appears on pictures. And
it is not the large camping/parking area that you first see
when you arrive. It is a short walk through the trees, and
up the hill.
THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF CANADA
OTTAWA CENTRE
OFFICERS AND COUNCIL, 1985
POSITION: NAME
TELEPHONE NO.* POSITION: NAME
TELEPHONE NO.*
Honourary
President: Dr. Jack Locke
523-0182 Treasurer: Mrs. Linda Meier
820-5784
President: Mr. Brian Burke
521-8856 (home)
990-9291 (work)
First Vice-
President: Mr. Robert McCallum
225-3167
Second Vice-
President: Mr. Rolf Meier
(Astronotes Editor)
820-5784
Librarian: Mr. Stan Mott
722-0957
Recorder: Ms. Sandy Ferguson
(Observers' Group
Vice-Chairwoman)
829-7514
Councillors: Mr. Art Fraser
(Membership Committee
Chairman)
737-4110
Mr. Michael Harrison
733-0431
Immediate
Past President: Mr. Peter MacKinnon
827-0934
Mr. Malcolm Lambourne
729-8112
Past Presidents: Mr. Ken Tapping
993-6060 (work)
Mr. Frank Roy
820-0874
M r . Romeo Wlochowicz
822-1799
Secretary: Mr. Robin Molson
(Observatory Committee
Chairman)
225-3082
* H o m e
te le p h o n e
Dr. Gary Susick
836-2451
Observers'
Group Chairman: Mr. Doug George
725-0668
n u m b e r s u n le s s o th e r w is e
in d ic a te d .ASTRO NOTES
c/o H e r z b e r g I n s t i t u t e of A s t r o p h y s i c s
National Research Council of Canada
1 0 0 Sussex Drive
O t t a wa Canada
K 1 A 0 R6
NATIONAL SECRATARY RASC
136 DUPONT ST. TORONTO ONT. M5B 1V2
i